pittance

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pit·tance

 (pĭt′ns)
n.
1. A meager monetary allowance, wage, or remuneration.
2. A very small amount: not a pittance of remorse.

[Middle English pitance, from Old French, allowance of food to a monk or poor person, from Medieval Latin pietantia, from *pietāns, *pietant-, present participle of *pietāre, to show compassion, from Latin pietās, piety; see pity.]

pittance

(ˈpɪtəns)
n
a small amount or portion, esp a meagre allowance of money
[C16: from Old French pietance ration, ultimately from Latin pietās duty]

pit•tance

(ˈpɪt ns)

n.
1. a small amount or share.
2. a small allowance of money.
3. a scanty wage or remuneration.
[1175–1225; Middle English pitaunce < Old French pitance, variant of pietance piety, pity, allowance of food]

Pittance

 a small portion; a small number or amount.
Examples: pittance of food; of grace, 1561; of instruction, 1841; of learning; of money; of reason and truth, 1561; of wages, 1749.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pittance - an inadequate payment; "they work all day for a mere pittance"
payment - a sum of money paid or a claim discharged

pittance

noun peanuts (slang), trifle, modicum, drop, mite, chicken feed (slang), slave wages, small allowance Her secretaries work tirelessly for a pittance.
Translations

pittance

[ˈpɪtəns] Nmiseria f
she gets paid a pittancele pagan una miseria

pittance

[ˈpɪtəns] nbouchée f de pain (fig)
He is paid a mere pittance → On ne le paye qu'une bouchée de pain.

pittance

nHungerlohn m

pittance

[ˈpɪtns] nmiseria, somma miserabile
References in classic literature ?
Robert is very well in a way, to give up all the money he can earn to the family, and keep the barest pittance for himself.
The little power you might have once possessed over the tribe of unrealities is gone You have bartered it for a pittance of the public gold.
Both Jonas and Marija might soon be earning no more than enough to pay their board, and besides that there were only the wages of Ona and the pittance of the little boy.
The stipendiary emoluments in consideration of which I entered into the service of - HEEP,"' always pausing before that word and uttering it with astonishing vigour, '"were not defined, beyond the pittance of twenty-two shillings and six per week.
It has pleased Our Lady and my patron saint to bless the pittance to which I restrain myself, even as the pulse and water was blessed to the children Shadrach, Meshech, and Abednego, who drank the same rather than defile themselves with the wine and meats which were appointed them by the King of the Saracens.
As soon as they have completed the term of eighty years, they are looked on as dead in law; their heirs immediately succeed to their estates; only a small pittance is reserved for their support; and the poor ones are maintained at the public charge.
Ten young descendants of Marius and the Gracchi, barefooted and out at elbows, with one hand resting on the hip and the other gracefully curved above the head, stared at the traveller, the post-chaise, and the horses; to these were added about fifty little vagabonds from the Papal States, who earned a pittance by diving into the Tiber at high water from the bridge of St.
They had no provisions left but a few dried salmon, yet finding the white men equally in want, they generously offered to share even this meager pittance, and frequently repeated the offer, with an earnestness that left no doubt of their sincerity.
This store was now nearly exhausted, and she had found a milliner who gave her a miserable pittance for toiling with her needle eight or ten hours each day.
I am sure my father will subscribe much of his little pittance, to place him in a station that is more worthy of him.
All their remaining stock of provisions consisted of forty pounds of Indian corn, twenty pounds of grease, about five pounds of portable soup, and a sufficient quantity of dried meat to allow each man a pittance of five pounds and a quarter, to be reserved for emergencies.
He was an orphan, who lived on a miserable pittance while he pursued the medical studies for which he had a special genius.