pitying


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pit·y

 (pĭt′ē)
n. pl. pit·ies
1. Sympathy and sorrow aroused by the misfortune or suffering of another.
2. A matter of regret: It's a pity she can't attend the reception.
v. pit·ied, pit·y·ing, pit·ies
v.tr.
To feel pity for or on account of: "No, he could not believe it a bad house; not such a house as a man was to be pitied for having" (Jane Austen)."An office worker pitied his confinement and slipped in to give him a loaf of bread" (Eric Scigliano).
v.intr.
To feel pity.
Idiom:
have/take pity on
To show compassion for.

[Middle English pite, from Old French, from Latin pietās, piety, compassion, from pius, dutiful.]

pit′y·ing·ly adv.
Synonyms: pity, compassion, sympathy, empathy, commiseration, condolence
These nouns signify kindly concern aroused by the misfortune, affliction, or suffering of another. Pity often implies a feeling of sorrow that inclines one to help or to show mercy. The word usually suggests that the person feeling pity is better off or in a superior position to the person who is the object of pity: "Going with her mother everywhere, she saw what Althea did not: how the other women invited her out of pity" (Kate Wheeler).
Compassion denotes deep awareness of the suffering of another and the wish to relieve it: "Compassion is not weakness, and concern for the unfortunate is not socialism" (Hubert H. Humphrey).
Sympathy denotes the act of or capacity for sharing in the sorrows or troubles of another: "They had little sympathy to spare for their unfortunate enemies" (William Hickling Prescott).
Empathy is an identification with and understanding of another's situation, feelings, and motives: Having changed schools several times as a child, I feel empathy for the transfer students. Commiseration often entails the expression of pity or sorrow: expressed their commiseration over the failure of the experiment. Condolence is formal, conventional sympathy, usually toward a person who has experienced the loss of a loved one: sent a letter of condolence to the bereaved family.

Pitying

 of turtledoves: modern version of a dole of dovesBk. of St. Albans, 1486.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

pitying

adjective
Feeling or expressing pity:
Archaic: piteous, pitiful.
Translations

pitying

[ˈpɪtɪɪŋ] ADJ (= compassionate) [look, smile] → lleno de compasión, compasivo; (= contemptuous) [look, smile] → de desprecio

pitying

[ˈpɪtiɪŋ] adj [look] → compatissant(e)

pitying

adj, pityingly
advmitleidig; glance alsobedauernd; (with contempt) → verächtlich

pitying

[ˈpɪtɪɪŋ] adjcompassionevole; (with contempt) → di commiserazione
References in classic literature ?
It would have been bad enough to go to her seat, and see the pitying faces of her friends, or the satisfied ones of her few enemies, but to face the whole school, with that shame fresh upon her, seemed impossible, and for a second she felt as if she could only drop down where she stood, and break her heart with crying.
Then, as if pitying a want of skill which had proved so fortunate to himself, he smiled, and muttered a few words of contempt in his own tongue.
On the whole, therefore, her new experience led our decayed gentlewoman to very disagreeable conclusions as to the temper and manners of what she termed the lower classes, whom heretofore she had looked down upon with a gentle and pitying complaisance, as herself occupying a sphere of unquestionable superiority.
Now came the dead friends of his youth, and his white-bearded father, with a saint-like frown, and his mother turning her face away as she passed by Ghost of a mother -- thinnest fantasy of a mother -- methinks she might yet have thrown a pitying glance towards her son
Out in the saloons the men could tell him all about the meaning of it; they gazed at him with pitying eyes--poor devil, he was blacklisted
Honestly, and with tears running down his own cheeks, he spoke of a heart of love in the skies, of a pitying Jesus, and an eternal home; but the ear was deaf with anguish, and the palsied heart could not feel.
He turns on me, looking pitying enough to make a body cry, and says:
Everybody was pitying Tom, he looked so quiet and sorrowful, and seemed to feel his great loss so deeply.