placenta


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to placenta: umbilical cord

pla·cen·ta

 (plə-sĕn′tə)
n. pl. pla·cen·tas or pla·cen·tae (-tē)
1.
a. A membranous vascular organ that develops in female eutherian mammals during pregnancy, lining the uterine wall and partially enveloping the fetus, to which it is attached by the umbilical cord. Following birth, the placenta is expelled.
b. A similar organ in marsupial mammals, consisting of a yolk sac attached to the uterine wall.
c. An organ with similar functions in some nonmammalian animals, such as certain sharks and reptiles.
2. Botany The part within the ovary of a flowering plant to which the ovules are attached.

[New Latin, from Latin, flat cake, alteration of Greek plakoenta, from accusative of plakoeis, flat, from plax, plak-, flat land, surface; see plāk- in Indo-European roots.]

pla·cen′tal adj.

placenta

(pləˈsɛntə)
n, pl -tas or -tae (-tiː)
1. (Anatomy) the vascular organ formed in the uterus during pregnancy, consisting of both maternal and embryonic tissues and providing oxygen and nutrients for the fetus and transfer of waste products from the fetal to the maternal blood circulation. See also afterbirth
2. (Zoology) the corresponding organ or part in certain mammals
3. (Botany) botany
a. the part of the ovary of flowering plants to which the ovules are attached
b. the mass of tissue in nonflowering plants that bears the sporangia or spores
[C17: via Latin from Greek plakoeis flat cake, from plax flat]

pla•cen•ta

(pləˈsɛn tə)

n., pl. -tas, -tae (-tē).
1. the organ in most mammals, formed in the lining of the uterus by the union of the uterine mucous membrane with the membranes of the fetus, that provides for the nourishment of the fetus and the elimination of its waste products.
2.
a. the part of the ovary of flowering plants that bears the ovules.
b. (in ferns and related plants) the tissue giving rise to sporangia.
[1670–80; < New Latin: something having a flat, circular form, Latin: a cake < Greek plakóenta, acc. of plakóeis flat cake, derivative of pláx (genitive plakós) flat]
pla•cen′tal, adj.

pla·cen·ta

(plə-sĕn′tə)
1. The sac-shaped organ that attaches the embryo or fetus to the uterus during pregnancy in most mammals. It supplies the fetus with oxygen and nutrients and is expelled after birth.
2. Botany The part of the ovary of a flowering plant to which the ovules are attached.

placental adjective

placenta

An organ formed in the uterus during pregnancy to nourish the fetus and remove its waste products.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.placenta - that part of the ovary of a flowering plant where the ovules formplacenta - that part of the ovary of a flowering plant where the ovules form
reproductive structure - the parts of a plant involved in its reproduction
ovary - the organ that bears the ovules of a flower
2.placenta - the vascular structure in the uterus of most mammals providing oxygen and nutrients for and transferring wastes from the developing fetus
embryonic membrane, caul, veil - the inner membrane of embryos in higher vertebrates (especially when covering the head at birth)
vascular structure - a structure composed of or provided with blood vessels
uterus, womb - a hollow muscular organ in the pelvic cavity of females; contains the developing fetus
afterbirth - the placenta and fetal membranes that are expelled from the uterus after the baby is born
Translations
placenta
istukka
fylgjalegkaka
łożysko
posteljica

placenta

[pləˈsentə] N (placentas or placentae (pl)) [pləˈsentiː]placenta f

placenta

[pləˈsɛntə] nplacenta mplace of worship nlieu m de culteplace setting ncouvert m

placenta

nPlazenta f

placenta

[pləˈsɛntə] nplacenta

pla·cen·ta

n. placenta, órgano vascular que se desarrolla en la pared del útero a través del cual el feto se nutre de la madre por medio del cordón umbilical;
abruptio ___L. abrupto placentae; annular ______ anular; decidiate ______ decidua; double ______ doble; ___ previa___ previa., localizada en el segmento uterino anterior.

placenta

n (pl -tas o -tae) placenta; — previa placenta previa
References in periodicals archive ?
Background: Cesarean section (CS) is an independent risk factor for placenta accreta.
Objective: To compare the morbidity associated with placenta previa with and without previous caesarean sections.
One of them brought in placenta stew, cooked in red wine with carrots and onions.
More than 200 millennia of human civilization and two centuries of modern medicine have brought us to this recent heavy-handed admonition by scientific researchers: Its probably a bad idea to eat your placenta.
Consuming encapsulated placenta has become all the rage among new moms, but new research suggests that it offers little to no benefits in aiding postpartum depression, fatigue and maternal bonding.
Summary: Washington DC [USA], Dec 2 (ANI): A study has recently suggested that new mothers consuming placenta pills, following childbirth, will experience little to no effect on their post-partum mood, maternal bonding or fatigue.
APH complicates about 2-5% of all the pregnancies, [1] APH can be due to placenta praevia, abruptio placentae, indeterminate cause or local causes of tract.
THE RATE OF PLACENTA ACCRETA has been rising, almost certainly as a consequence of the increasing cesarean delivery rate.
Circumvallate placenta is an abnormality of the placental shape where there is a central depression on the foetal surface surrounded by a greyish white thickened ring at the periphery (1).
TBut, 18 months later things are changing for Placenta Plus as owner, Danielle Kinney, 32, has a long list of celebrity clients and new mums waiting to try them.
RESULTS OF ULTRASONOGRAPHY on January 8 identified placenta accreta and placenta previa in a woman at 36 weeks of gestation.
Many theories speculate that the abnormal development of the placenta in the beginning of the pregnancy leads to systemic inflammation, oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, which in turn lead to PE's clinical manifestations (Hermes, Van Kesteren, & De Groot, 2012; Anderson, Olsson, Kristenses, Akerstrom, & Hansson, 2012).