plagiarism

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Related to plagiarisms: plagiarists

pla·gia·rism

 (plā′jə-rĭz′əm)
n.
1. The act or behavior of plagiarizing.
2. An instance of plagiarizing, especially a passage that is taken from the work of one person and reproduced in the work of another without attribution.

[From plagiary.]

pla′gia·rist n.
pla′gia·ris′tic adj.

plagiarism

(ˈpleɪdʒəˌrɪzəm)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the act of plagiarizing
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) something plagiarized
ˈplagiarist n
ˌplagiaˈristic adj

pla•gia•rism

(ˈpleɪ dʒəˌrɪz əm, -dʒi əˌrɪz-)

n.
1. the unauthorized use of the language and thoughts of another author and the representation of them as one's own.
2. something used and represented in this manner.
[1615–25]
pla′gia•rist, n.
pla`gia•ris′tic, adj.

plagiarism

1. the verbatim copying or imitation of the language, ideas, or thoughts of another author and representing them as one’s own original work.
2. the material so appropriated. Also plagiary.plagiarist, n.plagiaristic, adj.
See also: Theft
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plagiarism - a piece of writing that has been copied from someone else and is presented as being your own work
piece of writing, written material, writing - the work of a writer; anything expressed in letters of the alphabet (especially when considered from the point of view of style and effect); "the writing in her novels is excellent"; "that editorial was a fine piece of writing"
2.plagiarism - the act of plagiarizing; taking someone's words or ideas as if they were your own
copyright infringement, infringement of copyright - a violation of the rights secured by a copyright

plagiarism

noun copying, borrowing, theft, appropriation, infringement, piracy, lifting (informal), cribbing (informal) He's accused of plagiarism.
Quotations
"If you steal from one author, it's plagiarism; if you steal from many, it's research" [Wilson Mizner]
Translations
plagiátorství
plagiering
plágium
剽窃盗作
eser hırsızlığı

plagiarism

[ˈpleɪdʒɪərɪzəm] Nplagio m

plagiarism

[ˈpleɪdʒərɪzəm] nplagiat m

plagiarism

nPlagiat nt

plagiarism

[ˈpleɪdʒjəˌrɪzm] nplagio

plagiarize,

plagiarise

(ˈpleidʒəraiz) verb
to copy texts or take ideas from someone else's work and use them as if they were one's own.
ˈplagiarism (ˈpleidʒərizəm) noun
She was found guilty of plagiarism.
References in periodicals archive ?
It has been successfully used in practice for detecting plagiarisms among student Java program submissions.
Phillippsen, "JPlag: Finding Plagiarisms among a Set of Programs", Technical Report, 2000 http://www.
The JK system has the capability to detect deliberate attempts of plagiarism.
Keywords: Entropy, Plagiarism, Reverse Engineering, Software Engineering, Java Programs
The most unfortunate of these turn to plagiarism as a means of satisfying institutional requirements, demonstrating competence with the written word, and completing the degree program.
Plagiarism is the antithesis of writing integrity and can carry heavy consequences.
In the United States, plagiarism is deemed "a moral and ethical offense" rather than a legal one.
Instances of plagiarism surface even among the most elite cadres of impressively accomplished military professionals preparing to assume the highest levels of national leadership.
Plagiarism has most often been approached as a matter of academic dishonesty.
There is an increasing demand from faculty for software that allows better detection of instances of plagiarism, either to catch the culprits (in the case of intentional cheating) or to make students more aware of the issue and the extent to which their borrowings might be inappropriate--and new software tools such as Turnitin and SafeAssign (the latter available within Blackboard at UMass Boston) are perceived as a way of fighting fire with fire.
But at the same time, we'd like to suggest that the very fluidity of sources and resources being shared in the contemporary world may require that we, as faculty, move beyond overly simplified views of what constitutes plagiarism and how to address it with our students.
Wayne Rhodes begins by recasting our broad understanding of plagiarism in terms of influence, borrowing, and remixing in musical and artistic creation.