plague

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plague

 (plāg)
n.
1.
a. A highly infectious, usually fatal, epidemic disease; a pestilence.
b. A virulent, infectious disease that is caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis (syn. Pasteurella pestis) and is transmitted primarily by the bite of fleas from an infected rodent, especially a rat. In humans it occurs in bubonic form, marked by lymph node enlargement, and in pneumonic form, marked by infection of the lungs, and can progress to septicemia.
2.
a. A widespread affliction or calamity seen as divine retribution.
b. An influx or large number of destructive or unwanted things, especially animals: "The vines flourished, the only problem being a plague of jackrabbits" (Paul Lukacs).
c. Something that causes persistent hardship, trouble, or annoyance: "The plague of every funnyman's success is that deep down, almost everyone thinks they know forty guys funnier" (Ross Vachon).
tr.v. plagued, plagu·ing, plagues
1. To pester or annoy persistently or incessantly. See Synonyms at harass.
2.
a. To cause suffering or hardship for: "Runaway inflation further plagued the wage- or salary-earner" (Edwin O. Reischauer).
b. To be a widespread or continuous problem or defect in: Confusing jargon plagues the entire subject.

[Middle English plage, blow, calamity, plague, from Late Latin plāga, from Latin, blow, wound; see plāk- in Indo-European roots. V., Middle English plaghen, from Middle Dutch, from plaghe, plague, from Late Latin plāga.]

plagu′er n.

plague

(pleɪɡ)
n
1. (Pathology) any widespread and usually highly contagious disease with a high fatality rate
2. (Pathology) an infectious disease of rodents, esp rats, transmitted to man by the bite of the rat flea (Xenopsylla cheopis)
3. (Pathology) See bubonic plague
4. something that afflicts or harasses
5. informal an annoyance or nuisance
6. (Bible) a pestilence, affliction, or calamity on a large scale, esp when regarded as sent by God
7. archaic used to express annoyance, disgust, etc: a plague on you.
vb (tr) , plagues, plaguing or plagued
8. to afflict or harass
9. to bring down a plague upon
10. informal to annoy
[C14: from Late Latin plāga pestilence, from Latin: a blow; related to Greek plēgē a stroke, Latin plangere to strike]
ˈplaguer n

plague

(pleɪg)

n., v. plagued, pla•guing. n.
1. an epidemic disease that causes high mortality; pestilence.
2. an infectious, epidemic disease caused by a bacterium, Yersinia pestis, characterized by fever, chills, and prostration, transmitted to humans from rats by means of the bites of fleas. Compare bubonic plague.
3. any widespread affliction, calamity, or evil.
4. any cause of trouble, annoyance, or vexation.
v.t.
5. to trouble, annoy, or torment in any manner.
6. to smite with a plague or pestilence.
7. to cause an epidemic in or among.
8. to afflict with any evil.
[1350–1400; Middle English plage < Late Latin plāga pestilence, Latin: stripe, wound]
pla′guer, n.
syn: See bother.

plague

(plāg)
1. Any highly infectious, usually fatal epidemic disease.
2. An often fatal disease caused by a bacterium transmitted to humans usually by fleas that have bitten infected rats or other rodents. The most common form of plague is bubonic plague, though plague can also exist as a highly contagious form infecting the lungs and as an extremely severe form infecting the blood.

Plague

 a group which, by their size, number, or nature, cause devastation or irritation.
Examples: plague of confessors, 1604; of gnats, 1847; of hail, 1382; of infidels, 1596; of locusts, 1774; of brass money, 1855; of rain and water, 1548; of fell (foul) tempest, 1513.

plague


Past participle: plagued
Gerund: plaguing

Imperative
plague
plague
Present
I plague
you plague
he/she/it plagues
we plague
you plague
they plague
Preterite
I plagued
you plagued
he/she/it plagued
we plagued
you plagued
they plagued
Present Continuous
I am plaguing
you are plaguing
he/she/it is plaguing
we are plaguing
you are plaguing
they are plaguing
Present Perfect
I have plagued
you have plagued
he/she/it has plagued
we have plagued
you have plagued
they have plagued
Past Continuous
I was plaguing
you were plaguing
he/she/it was plaguing
we were plaguing
you were plaguing
they were plaguing
Past Perfect
I had plagued
you had plagued
he/she/it had plagued
we had plagued
you had plagued
they had plagued
Future
I will plague
you will plague
he/she/it will plague
we will plague
you will plague
they will plague
Future Perfect
I will have plagued
you will have plagued
he/she/it will have plagued
we will have plagued
you will have plagued
they will have plagued
Future Continuous
I will be plaguing
you will be plaguing
he/she/it will be plaguing
we will be plaguing
you will be plaguing
they will be plaguing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been plaguing
you have been plaguing
he/she/it has been plaguing
we have been plaguing
you have been plaguing
they have been plaguing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been plaguing
you will have been plaguing
he/she/it will have been plaguing
we will have been plaguing
you will have been plaguing
they will have been plaguing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been plaguing
you had been plaguing
he/she/it had been plaguing
we had been plaguing
you had been plaguing
they had been plaguing
Conditional
I would plague
you would plague
he/she/it would plague
we would plague
you would plague
they would plague
Past Conditional
I would have plagued
you would have plagued
he/she/it would have plagued
we would have plagued
you would have plagued
they would have plagued
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plague - a serious (sometimes fatal) infection of rodents caused by Yersinia pestis and accidentally transmitted to humans by the bite of a flea that has bitten an infected animalplague - a serious (sometimes fatal) infection of rodents caused by Yersinia pestis and accidentally transmitted to humans by the bite of a flea that has bitten an infected animal
epidemic disease - any infectious disease that develops and spreads rapidly to many people
bubonic plague, glandular plague, pestis bubonica - the most common form of the plague in humans; characterized by chills, prostration, delirium and the formation of buboes in the armpits and groin; does not spread from person to person
plague pneumonia, pneumonic plague, pulmonic plague - a rapidly progressive and frequently fatal form of the plague that can spread through the air from person to person; characterized by lung involvement with chill, bloody expectoration and high fever
septicemic plague - an especially dangerous and generally fatal form of the plague in which infecting organisms invade the bloodstream; does not spread from person to person
2.plague - any epidemic disease with a high death rate
epidemic disease - any infectious disease that develops and spreads rapidly to many people
3.plague - a swarm of insects that attack plants; "a plague of grasshoppers"
swarm, cloud - a group of many things in the air or on the ground; "a swarm of insects obscured the light"; "clouds of blossoms"; "it discharged a cloud of spores"
4.plague - any large scale calamity (especially when thought to be sent by God)
calamity, catastrophe, tragedy, disaster, cataclysm - an event resulting in great loss and misfortune; "the whole city was affected by the irremediable calamity"; "the earthquake was a disaster"
5.plague - an annoyance; "those children are a damn plague"
pain in the ass, pain in the neck, bother, botheration, infliction, annoyance, pain - something or someone that causes trouble; a source of unhappiness; "washing dishes was a nuisance before we got a dish washer"; "a bit of a bother"; "he's not a friend, he's an infliction"
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
Verb1.plague - cause to suffer a blightplague - cause to suffer a blight; "Too much rain may blight the garden with mold"
afflict, smite - cause physical pain or suffering in; "afflict with the plague"
2.plague - annoy continually or chronicallyplague - annoy continually or chronically; "He is known to harry his staff when he is overworked"; "This man harasses his female co-workers"
needle, goad - goad or provoke,as by constant criticism; "He needled her with his sarcastic remarks"
annoy, devil, gravel, irritate, nark, rile, vex, nettle, rag, bother, chafe, get at, get to - cause annoyance in; disturb, especially by minor irritations; "Mosquitoes buzzing in my ear really bothers me"; "It irritates me that she never closes the door after she leaves"
bedevil, dun, rag, torment, frustrate, crucify - treat cruelly; "The children tormented the stuttering teacher"
haze - harass by imposing humiliating or painful tasks, as in military institutions

plague

noun
1. disease, infection, epidemic, contagion, pandemic, pestilence, lurgy (informal) A cholera plague had killed many prisoners of war.
2. infestation, invasion, epidemic, influx, host, swarm, multitude The city is under threat from a plague of rats.
3. (Informal) bane, trial, cancer, evil, curse, torment, blight, calamity, scourge, affliction the cynicism which is the plague of our generation
4. (Informal) nuisance, problem, pain (informal), bother, pest, hassle (informal), annoyance, irritant, aggravation (informal), vexation, thorn in your flesh Those children can be a real plague at times.
verb
1. torment, trouble, pain, torture, haunt, afflict (informal) She was plagued by weakness, fatigue, and dizziness.
2. pester, trouble, bother, disturb, annoy, tease, harry, harass, hassle, fret, badger, persecute, molest, vex, bedevil, get on your nerves (informal), give someone grief (Brit. & S. African), be on your back (slang), get in your hair (informal) I'm not going to plague you with a lot of questions.

plague

noun
1. A cause of suffering or harm:
2. A sudden increase in something, as the occurrence of a disease:
verb
1. To disturb by repeated attacks:
2. To trouble persistently from or as if from all sides:
3. To bring great harm or suffering to:
Translations
طاعونعددٌ هائِلٌ منيُزْعِج، يُضايِق
mortrápitzáplavahejno
plagepestpestilensbølge
katkrändtaud
kiusatakulkutautiruttovaivatavitsaus
borzasztóan sokgyötörpestis
angraplágaplága, drepsótt
maras
mērismilzumsnelikt mierāordauzmākties
kuganadloga
başına dert olmakistilâmusallat olmaksürüveba

plague

[pleɪg]
A. N (= disease) → peste f (fig) → plaga f, fastidio m
a plague of ratsuna plaga de ratas
the plaguela peste
to avoid sth/sb like the plaguehuir de algo/algn como de la peste, evitar algo a toda costa
B. VT (lit) → infestar (fig) → plagar; [+ person] → atormentar
the area is plagued with malariala zona está infestada de malaria
the thought has been plaguing mela idea me viene atormentando
the project has been plagued with problems from the beginningel proyecto se ha visto plagado de problemas desde el comienzo
a country plagued by recessionun país asolado por la recesión
to plague sb with questionsacosar a algn con preguntas

plague

[ˈpleɪg]
n
(MEDICINE) (bubonic)peste f
the plague → la peste
to avoid sb like the plague → éviter qn comme la peste
to avoid sth like the plague → éviter qch comme la peste
(MEDICINE) (= epidemic) → épidémie f
(= large numbers) a plague of [rats, locusts] → une invasion de; [attacks, robberies] → une vague de
(= curse) → fléau m
vt
(= afflict) → empoisonner la vie de
Fears about job security plague nearly half the workforce → Les craintes sur la sécurité de l'emploi empoisonnent la vie de près de la moitié du personnel.
to be plagued by sth [+ problems, difficulties] → être assailli(e) par qch
The system is still plagued by technical faults → Le système est toujours affecté par des dysfonctionnements à répétition.; [+ illness]
She was plagued by fatigue and dizziness → Elle souffrait de fatigue et de vertiges chroniques.
to be plagued by doubts → être assailli(e) par le doute
(= pester) → harceler
to plague sb with questions → harceler qn de questions

plague

n (Med) → Seuche f; (Bibl, fig) → Plage f; the plaguedie Pest; to avoid somebody/something like the plaguejdn/etw wie die Pest meiden; we’re suffering from a plague of crimewir leiden unter einer wahren Flut an Verbrechen; a plague of reporters descended on the towneine Horde von Reportern suchte die Stadt heim; a plague on him! (old)die Pest möge über ihn kommen! (old)
vtplagen; to plague the life out of somebodyjdn (bis aufs Blut) quälen, jdm das Leben schwer machen; to be plagued by doubts/injuryvon Zweifeln/Verletzungen geplagt werden; to be plagued by bad luckvom Pech verfolgt werden; to plague somebody with questionsjdn ständig mit Fragen belästigen

plague

[pleɪg]
1. n (disease, also) (fig) → peste f; (of rats, locusts) → invasione f
to avoid sb/sth like the plague → evitare qn/qc come la peste
2. vt (fig) → tormentare
to plague sb with questions → assillare qn di domande

plague

(pleig) noun
1. especially formerly, an extremely infectious and deadly disease, especially one carried by fleas from rats.
2. a large and annoying quantity. a plague of flies.
verb
to annoy or pester continually or frequently. The child was plaguing her with questions.

plague

n. peste.
peste bubónica, infección epidémica transmitida por la picadura de pulgas de ratas;
enfermedad epidémica que causa alta mortalidad.

plague

n peste f; bubonic — peste bubónica
References in classic literature ?
If you have plagued him, he's sober and walks slowly, as if he wanted to go back and do his work better.
Why, re'lly, she did seem to me to valley the child more 'cause 't was sickly and cross, and plagued her; and she warn't making b'lieve, neither,--cried about it, she did, and lopped round, as if she'd lost every friend she had.
My sister will be equally sorry to miss the pleasure of seeing you; but she has been very much plagued lately with nervous head-aches, which make her unfit for company or conversation.
Miss Cathy and he were now very thick; but Hindley hated him: and to say the truth I did the same; and we plagued and went on with him shamefully: for I wasn't reasonable enough to feel my injustice, and the mistress never put in a word on his behalf when she saw him wronged.
My father, King Henry, had faithful servants He had but to say that he was plagued with a factious priest, and the blood of Thomas-a-Becket, saint though he was, stained the steps of his own altar.