plaid

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plaid
clockwise from top left: Malcolm, Gordon Dress, and Stewart Dress plaid patterns

plaid

 (plăd)
n.
1.
a. Cloth, often made of wool, with a tartan or checked pattern.
b. A pattern of this kind.
2. A rectangular woolen scarf of a tartan pattern worn over the left shoulder by Scottish Highlanders.

[Probably Scots plaid, plyd, past participle of ply, to fold, from Middle English plien; see ply1.]

plaid, plaid′ed adj.

plaid

(plæd; pleɪd)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) a long piece of cloth of a tartan pattern, worn over the shoulder as part of Highland costume
2. (Textiles)
a. a crisscross weave or cloth
b. (as modifier): a plaid scarf.
[C16: from Scottish Gaelic plaide, of obscure origin]

plaid

(plæd)

n.
1. any fabric woven of differently colored yarns in a cross-barred pattern.
2. a pattern of this kind.
3. a long, rectangular piece of cloth, usu. with such a pattern and worn across the left shoulder by Scottish Highlanders.
adj.
4. having the pattern of a plaid.
Compare tartan.
[1505–15; < Scottish Gaelic plaide blanket, plaid (definition 3)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plaid - a cloth having a crisscross designplaid - a cloth having a crisscross design  
cloth, fabric, textile, material - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"
Translations

plaid

[plæd]
A. N (= cloth) → tela f escocesa or a cuadros; (= cloak) → manta f escocesa, plaid m
B. CPD [skirt, trousers, shirt] → escocés

plaid

[ˈplæd ˈpleɪd]
n
(= material) → tissu m écossais
(= pattern) → motif m écossais
(= tartan worn over the shoulder) → plaid m
modif [shirt, jacket] → à carreaux
a plaid shirt → une chemise écossaise, une chemise à carreaux

plaid

nPlaid nt; plaid skirtkarierter Rock

plaid

[plæd] n (material) → tessuto scozzese; (cloak) → plaid m inv
a plaid shirt → una camicia scozzese
References in classic literature ?
The clansmen on every side stripped their plaids, prepared their arms, and there was an awful pause of about three minutes, during which the men, pulling off their bonnets, raised their faces to heaven, and uttered a short prayer; then pulled their bonnets over their brows and began to move forward at first slowly.
Knowing the effect of show and dress upon men in savage life, and wishing to make a favorable impression as the eris, or chiefs, of the great American Fur Company, some of them appeared in Highland plaids and kilts to the great admiration of the natives.
This lady, who was long, lean and loosely put together, was clad in raiment intricately looped and fringed, with plaids and stripes and bands of plain colour disposed in a design to which the clue seemed missing.
So we hunted up the old stories, got a bagpipe, put on our plaids, and went in, heart and soul, for the glory of the Clan.
Progress in the valley An Indian cavalier The captain falls into a lethargy A Nez Perce patriarch Hospitable treatment The bald head Bargaining Value of an old plaid cloak The family horse The cost of an Indian present
Between two of the sleepers still in position I and my companion observed the remnant of a plaid shawl, and examining it found that it was wrapped about the shoulders of the body of a woman, of which but little remained besides the bones, partly covered with fragments of clothing, and brown dry skin.
She got up to rouse herself, and slipped off her plaid and the cape of her warm dress.
He touched the brim of the old plaid bicycle cap perched on the back of his head.
On the left of his great leader sat the poetic Snodgrass, and near him again the sporting Winkle; the former poetically enveloped in a mysterious blue cloak with a canine-skin collar, and the latter communicating additional lustre to a new green shooting-coat, plaid neckerchief, and closely-fitted drabs.
She looked demure and pretty, and made a graceful picture in her blue cashmere dress and little blue hat, with a plaid shawl drawn neatly about her shoulders and a clumsy pocket-book in her hand.
Robinson's red plaid shawl, and Deacon Milliken's wig, on crooked, the bare benches and torn hymn-books, the hanging texts and maps, were no longer visible, and she saw blue skies and burning stars, white turbans and gay colors; Mr.
Unless the little man in the plaid mackintosh poured it into the coffee with the milk," she said, "I could not possibly have imbibed it, for I haven't spoken to another soul since we left.