plaint

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plaint

 (plānt)
n.
1. A complaint.
2. An utterance of grief or sorrow; a lamentation.

[Middle English, from Old French plainte, from Latin plānctus, lament, from past participle of plangere, to strike one's breast, lament; see plāk- in Indo-European roots.]

plaint

(pleɪnt)
n
1. (Poetry) archaic a complaint or lamentation
2. (Law) law a statement in writing of grounds of complaint made to a court of law and asking for redress of the grievance
[C13: from Old French plainte, from Latin planctus lamentation, from plangere to beat]

plaint

(pleɪnt)

n.
1. a complaint.
2. a lament; lamentation.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Middle French < Latin planctus a striking or beating (the breast) in grief =plang(ere) to beat, strike, mourn for + -tus suffix of v. action]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plaint - (United Kingdom) a written statement of the grounds of complaint made to court of law asking for the grievance to be redressed
allegation - (law) a formal accusation against somebody (often in a court of law); "an allegation of malpractice"
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
2.plaint - a cry of sorrow and griefplaint - a cry of sorrow and grief; "their pitiful laments could be heard throughout the ward"
complaint - (formerly) a loud cry (or repeated cries) of pain or rage or sorrow
Translations

plaint

n (liter)
(= complaint)Wehklage f (geh)
(= cry)Gejammer nt; the moans and plaints of their childrendas Gequäke und Gejammer ihrer Kinder
References in classic literature ?
To all these com- plaints, no matter how unjust, the slave must an- swer never a word.
Thus he resolv'd, but first from inward griefe His bursting passion into plaints thus pour'd:
Plaints made in common are almost prayers, and prayers where two or three are gathered together invoke the mercy of heaven.
But then came the days of sadness, when Adam was someway on in his teens, and Thias began to loiter at the public-houses, and Lisbeth began to cry at home, and to pour forth her plaints in the hearing of her sons.
Pearce shuts the door; and Eliza's plaints are no longer audible.
Then on the bank of Jordan, by a creek, Where winds with reeds and osiers whispering play, Plain fishermen (no greater men them call), Close in a cottage low together got, Their unexpected loss and plaints outbreathed:-- "Alas, from what high hope to what relapse Unlooked for are we fallen
Bring in brother John, and let him hear the plaints which have been urged against him.
Amused, at first, at these plaints, he provoked them for fun.
She remembered, dimly, the blight of hard times in the past, and the plaints of fathers and mothers in those days returned to her with a new significance.
Death cannonized for us one saint, Ever less human than divine, And still we lay, with tender plaint, Relics in this household shrine-- The silver bell, so seldom rung, The little cap which last she wore, The fair, dead Catherine that hung By angels borne above her door.
But, in the milder moments of their plaint, these emblems of purity and sweetness were cast back to their places, with every sign of tenderness and regret.
They had to be torn apart by force; the girl had to be dragged away, and she struggled and fought and shrieked like one gone mad till a turn of the road hid her from sight; and even after that, we could still make out the fading plaint of those receding shrieks.