plaited


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plait

 (plāt, plăt)
n.
1. A braid, especially of hair.
2. A pleat.
tr.v. plait·ed, plait·ing, plaits
1. To braid.
2. To pleat.
3. To make by braiding.

[Middle English pleit, fold, braid, possibly from pleiten, to fold, braid, alteration (influenced by Old French pleit, fold) of Old French plier, pleiir, from Latin plicāre, to fold; see plek- in Indo-European roots.]

plait′er n.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
All her beautiful hair had been drawn back and plaited.
Velvet garments sombre but rich, stiffly plaited ruffs and bands, embroidered gloves, venerable beards, the mien and countenance of authority, made it easy to distinguish the gentleman of worship, at that period, from the tradesman, with his plodding air, or the laborer, in his leathern jerkin, stealing awe-stricken into the house which he had perhaps helped to build.
But strangely crowning his ebonness was a glistening white plaited turban, the living hair braided and coiled round and round upon his head.
And as that famous great tierce is mystically carved in front, so the whale's vast plaited forehead forms innumerable strange devices for the emblematical adornment of his wondrous tun.
We shall see, for if he puts her in I shall recognize her by her Black Forest clothes, and her burned complexion, her plump figure, her fat hands, her dull expression, her gentle spirit, her generous feet, her bonnetless head, and the plaited tails of hemp-colored hair hanging down her back.
As he was passing by the house where Jeff Thatcher lived, he saw a new girl in the garden -- a lovely little blue-eyed creature with yellow hair plaited into two long-tails, white summer frock and embroidered pan- talettes.
And then they both stared at me, and I, with an obtrusive show of artlessness on my countenance, stared at them, and plaited the right leg of my trousers with my right hand.
Then I took him and wrapped him up in my bundle of medicines, and outside of all I rolled a mat of plaited grass.
This upper robe concealed what at first view seemed rather inconsistent with its form, a shirt, namely, of linked mail, with sleeves and gloves of the same, curiously plaited and interwoven, as flexible to the body as those which are now wrought in the stocking-loom, out of less obdurate materials.
She crossed the ditch, took a pair of gardening gloves from her plaited straw hand-basket, and busied herself with the hemlock leaves, pulling the tender ones, separating them from the stalk, and filling the basket with the web.
Harry, imagine a girl, hardly seventeen years of age, with a little, flowerlike face, a small Greek head with plaited coils of dark-brown hair, eyes that were violet wells of passion, lips that were like the petals of a rose.
She plaited a bed for herself of blades of grass, and hung it up under a clover-leaf, so that she was protected from the rain; she gathered honey from the flowers for food, and drank the dew on the leaves every morning.