planet


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plan·et

 (plăn′ĭt)
n.
1.
a. In the traditional model of solar systems, a celestial body larger than an asteroid or comet, illuminated by light from a star, such as the sun, around which it revolves.
b. A celestial body that orbits the sun, has sufficient mass to assume nearly a round shape, clears out dust and debris from the neighborhood around its orbit, and is not a satellite of another planet.
2. One of the seven celestial bodies, Mercury, Venus, the moon, the sun, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn, visible to the naked eye and thought by ancient astronomers to revolve in the heavens about a fixed Earth and among fixed stars.
3.
a. The collection of life forms supported on Earth: an asteroid that threatened the whole planet.
b. People as a whole; humankind or the general public: The entire planet was affected by the global recession.
4. One of the seven revolving astrological celestial bodies that in conjunction with the stars are believed to influence human affairs and personalities.

[Middle English, from Old French planete, from Late Latin planēta, from Greek planētēs, variant of planēs, planēt-, from planāsthai, to wander; see pelə- in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: Clyde Tombaugh's discovery of Pluto in 1930 added a ninth planet to our solar system, and thereafter students of astronomy were taught the familiar list of nine planets: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto. But in 2006, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) voted to change the definition of planet, requiring that a celestial body must have enough mass to assume a round shape and "clear the neighborhood around its orbit" in order to qualify as a planet. This means that a planet cannot have other objects in or crossing its orbit except smaller objects that have been captured by its gravity, such as those that revolve around it as moons. Because Neptune's large mass has captured Pluto so that the two planets remain in orbits that cross, Pluto has not cleared its own orbit and was therefore demoted from planet status to that of a newly created category, dwarf planet. Like a planet, a dwarf planet orbits the sun, is large enough to assume a nearly round shape, and does not orbit a planet (as our Moon does). But a dwarf planet does not clear the neighborhood around its orbit and may cross the paths of other objects orbiting the sun. Other dwarf planets include Ceres, whose orbit is in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter, and Eris, an object in the Kuiper belt beyond Pluto. At the same meeting, the IAU created a third category of objects known as small solar system bodies, which includes asteroids (sometimes referred to as "minor planets," compounding the difficulty of the term planet), comets, objects beyond Neptune's orbit, and other nonspherical bodies. Although officially approved, this new scheme of the solar system remains controversial among astronomers and may well be revised.

planet

(ˈplænɪt)
n
1. (Celestial Objects) Also called: major planet any of the eight celestial bodies, Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, that revolve around the sun in elliptical orbits and are illuminated by light from the sun
2. (Celestial Objects) Also called: extrasolar planet any other celestial body revolving around a star, illuminated by light from that star
3. (Astrology) astrology any of the planets of the solar system, excluding the earth but including the sun and moon, each thought to rule one or sometimes two signs of the zodiac. See also house9
[C12: via Old French from Late Latin planēta, from Greek planētēs wanderer, from planaein to wander]

plan•et

(ˈplæn ɪt)

n.
1.
a. any of the nine large heavenly bodies revolving about the sun and shining by reflected light: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, or Pluto in the order of their proximity to the sun.
b. a similar body revolving about a star other than the sun.
c. (formerly) a moving celestial body, as distinguished from a fixed star, applied also to the sun and moon.
2. Astrol. any celestial body regarded as exerting an influence on human affairs.
3. (often cap.) the planet Earth considered as a single ecosystem.
[1250–1300; Middle English planete (< Old French planète) < Late Latin planētae < Greek (astéres) planḗtai literally, wandering (stars)]

plan·et

(plăn′ĭt)
A celestial body that does not produce its own light, is larger than an asteroid, and is illuminated by light from a star, such as the sun, around which it revolves. In our solar system there are eight planets: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Pluto was considered a planet until 2006, when it was reclassified as a dwarf planet.

planetary adjective
Word History To learn the origins of the names of the planets is to have a little lesson in Roman mythology. Mercury moves fastest through the sky and was named after the swift-footed messenger of the gods, Mercury. Venus, the morning and evening star, was named after the Roman goddess of love because of its beauty and the pure brightness of its light. The reddish appearance of Mars reminded early astronomers of the color of blood, so Mars was named after the Roman god of war. Jupiter is the largest of the planets and was named after the king of the gods. Jupiter's father was Saturn, the name given to the next planet after Jupiter. To continue that logic, the name of Saturn's own father, Uranus, was given to the next planet after Saturn. Viewed through a telescope, the planet Neptune appears sea-green, and it gets its name from the Roman god of the sea. Finally, the darkest reaches of the solar system are the home of the frozen object Pluto, traditionally considered a planet, and named after the god of the cold world of the dead, the underworld.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.planet - (astronomy) any of the nine large celestial bodies in the solar system that revolve around the sun and shine by reflected lightplanet - (astronomy) any of the nine large celestial bodies in the solar system that revolve around the sun and shine by reflected light; Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto in order of their proximity to the sun; viewed from the constellation Hercules, all the planets rotate around the sun in a counterclockwise direction
astronomy, uranology - the branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a whole
biosphere - the regions of the surface and atmosphere of the Earth (or other planet) where living organisms exist
celestial body, heavenly body - natural objects visible in the sky
inferior planet - any of the planets whose orbit lies inside the earth's orbit
gas giant, Jovian planet - any of the four outermost planets in the solar system; much larger than Earth and gaseous in nature (like Jupiter)
daystar, morning star, Phosphorus, Lucifer - a planet (usually Venus) seen just before sunrise in the eastern sky
outer planet - (astronomy) a major planet whose orbit is outside the asteroid belt (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Pluto)
solar system - the sun with the celestial bodies that revolve around it in its gravitational field
superior planet - any of the planets whose orbit lies outside the earth's orbit
terrestrial planet - a planet having a compact rocky surface like the Earth's; the four innermost planets in the solar system
2.planet - a person who follows or serves another
follower - a person who accepts the leadership of another
3.planet - any celestial body (other than comets or satellites) that revolves around a star
celestial body, heavenly body - natural objects visible in the sky

planet

noun

Planets

Earth, Jupiter, Mars, Mercury, Neptune, Pluto, Saturn, Uranus, Venus
Translations
كوكبكَوكَبكوكَب سَيّار
планета
planeta
planeta
planet
planedo
planeet
planeetta
planet
bolygóplanéta
plánetapláneta, reikistjarnareikistjarna
惑星
행성위성유성
planetaplanetinisplanetų
planēta
planéta
planet
planet
ดาวเคราะห์เก้าดวง
планета
hành tinh

planet

[ˈplænɪt] Nplaneta m
the planet Earthel planeta Tierra

planet

[ˈplænɪt] nplanète f
what planet is he on? → il est sur quelle planète? planet Earth

planet

nPlanet m

planet

[ˈplænɪt] npianeta m

planet

(ˈplӕnit) noun
any of the bodies (eg the Earth) which move round the Sun or round another star. Mars and Jupiter are planets, but the Moon is not.
ˈplanetary adjective

planet

كَوكَب planeta planet Planet πλανήτης planeta planeetta planète planet pianeta 惑星 행성 planeet planet planeta planeta планета planet ดาวเคราะห์เก้าดวง gezegen hành tinh 星球
References in classic literature ?
The planet Mars, I scarcely need remind the reader, re- volves about the sun at a mean distance of 140,000,000 miles, and the light and heat it receives from the sun is barely half of that received by this world.
Thus, then, advancing from atom to molecule, from molecule to nebulous mass, from that to principal star, from star to sun, from sun to planet, and hence to satellite, we have the whole series of transformations undergone by the heavenly bodies during the first days of the world.
Twelve years had passed since I had read the remarkable manuscript of this remarkable man; this man who remembered no childhood and who could not even offer a vague guess as to his age; who was always young and yet who had dandled my grandfather's great-grandfather upon his knee; this man who had spent ten years upon the planet Mars; who had fought for the green men of Barsoom and fought against them; who had fought for and against the red men and who had won the ever beautiful Dejah Thoris, Princess of Helium, for his wife, and for nearly ten years had been a prince of the house of Tardos Mors, Jeddak of Helium.
I am of another world," I answered, "the great planet Earth, which revolves about our common sun and next within the orbit of your Barsoom, which we know as Mars.
One side of that planet feels the genial warmth of the sun for a fortnight, while the other is for the same period without it," he continued.
Well, suppose this house, just as it is, placed a few billion miles above a planet, and with nothing else near enough to disturb it: of course it falls to the planet?
A Planet liner, east bound, heaves up in a superb spiral and takes the air of us humming.
Either the moon or the planet Mercury was passing across the sun's disk.
His life was bounded, east, west, north, and south, by the Planet Insurance Company, which employed him; and that there were other ways in which a man might fulfil himself than by giving daily imitations behind a counter of a mechanical figure walking in its sleep had never seriously crossed his mind.
It may seem to be a matter of indifference whether we understand the meaning of historical events this way or that; yet there is the same difference between a man who says that the people of the West moved on the East because Napoleon wished it and a man who says that this happened because it had to happen, as there is between those who declared that the earth was stationary and that the planets moved round it and those who admitted that they did not know what upheld the earth, but knew there were laws directing its movement and that of the other planets.
Mid planets her slaves, Herself in the Heavens, Her beam on the waves.
1-17) Ares, exceeding in strength, chariot-rider, golden- helmed, doughty in heart, shield-bearer, Saviour of cities, harnessed in bronze, strong of arm, unwearying, mighty with the spear, O defence of Olympus, father of warlike Victory, ally of Themis, stern governor of the rebellious, leader of righteous men, sceptred King of manliness, who whirl your fiery sphere among the planets in their sevenfold courses through the aether wherein your blazing steeds ever bear you above the third firmament of heaven; hear me, helper of men, giver of dauntless youth