plankton


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plank·ton

 (plăngk′tən)
n.
The small or microscopic organisms that drift or swim weakly in a body of water, including bacteria, diatoms, jellyfish, and various larvae. Plankton is an important food source for fish and other larger organisms.

[German, from Greek, neuter of planktos, wandering, from plazein, to turn aside; see plāk- in Indo-European roots.]

plank·ton′ic (-tŏn′ĭk) adj.

plankton

(ˈplæŋktən)
n
(Biology) the organisms inhabiting the surface layer of a sea or lake, consisting of small drifting plants and animals, such as diatoms. Compare nekton
[C19: via German from Greek planktos wandering, from plazesthai to roam]
planktonic adj

plank•ton

(ˈplæŋk tən)

n.
the aggregate of passively floating, drifting, or somewhat motile organisms occurring in a body of water, primarily comprising microscopic algae and protozoa.
[1890–95; < German < Greek, neuter of planktós drifting, v. adj. of plázesthai to drift, roam, wander]
plank•ton′ic (-ˈtɒn ɪk) adj.

plank·ton

(plăngk′tən)
Small organisms that float or drift in great numbers in bodies of salt or fresh water. Plankton is a primary food source for many animals, and consists of bacteria, protozoans, certain algae, cnidarians, tiny crustaceans such as copepods, and many other organisms.

plankton

Microscopic aquatic organisms that float near the surface of water.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plankton - the aggregate of small plant and animal organisms that float or drift in great numbers in fresh or salt waterplankton - the aggregate of small plant and animal organisms that float or drift in great numbers in fresh or salt water
organism, being - a living thing that has (or can develop) the ability to act or function independently
phytoplankton - photosynthetic or plant constituent of plankton; mainly unicellular algae
zooplankton - animal constituent of plankton; mainly small crustaceans and fish larvae
copepod, copepod crustacean - minute marine or freshwater crustaceans usually having six pairs of limbs on the thorax; some abundant in plankton and others parasitic on fish
congeries, conglomeration, aggregate - a sum total of many heterogenous things taken together
Translations
كائِنات حَيَّة دَقيقَه
plankton
plankton
plankton
svif
planktonas
planktons
planktón
plânkton

plankton

[ˈplæŋktən] Nplankton m

plankton

[ˈplæŋktən] nplancton mplanned economy néconomie planifiée

plankton

nPlankton nt

plankton

[ˈplæŋktən] nplancton m inv

plankton

(ˈplӕŋktən) noun
very tiny living creatures floating in seas, lakes etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The oceans are huge drivers in the environmental equations, because within them the plankton process vast stores of gases.
That means they take in whatever's floating by - not only plankton and other food, but viruses, bacteria, mercury, and who-knows-what-else.
It's really important for us to understand what controls these boom-and-bust cycles, and how they might change in the future so we can better evaluate the implications on all other parts of the food web," Michael Behrenfeld, a marine plankton expert at Oregon State University in Corvallis, said in a (https://www.
Tenders are invited for a requirement exists for the charter of a commercial fishing vessel for a period of 14 days to survey whether the spawning of horse mackerel is extending later in the year in ices divisions vi and vii using a gulf vii plankton sampler, to be provided by the marine institute.
These pelagic fish are interrelated through a food web whose foundation is the plankton (phytoplankton and zooplankton).
Masses of plankton add swirls of green to the blue waters of the Arabian Sea in this February 3 snapshot from NASA's Aqua satellite (Iran and Pakistan at top of the image; India, to the right).
More than 30 barrel jellyfish, which can be 3ft wide, have been stranded after coming inshore to feed on plankton enriched by nutrients carried by floodwater.
Russian officials said in 2014 they found evidence of sea plankton on the surface of the ISS, according to (https://www.
Of course, global warming and carbon dioxide will cause problems but overfishing, even for krill and plankton, doesn't help.
The oceanographers onboard will be conducting research using a Continuous Plankton Recorder which measures the distribution and concentration of plankton in the Atlantic basin which serves as an indicator of ocean health.
After investigating the samples, it was found that the oxygen shortage was caused by the excessive growth of plankton, which is scientifically known as prorocentrum arcuatum, an expert from the centre said.