plantain


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plan·tain 1

 (plăn′tən)
n.
Any of various plants of the genus Plantago, having a basal rosette of leaves and dense spikes of small greenish flowers.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin plantāgō, plantāgin-, from planta, sole of the foot (from its broad leaves); see plat- in Indo-European roots.]

plan·tain 2

 (plăn′tən)
n.
1. Any of several varieties of banana, especially Musa ×paradisiaca, having edible, starchy, elongated fruit.
2. The fruit of this plant, usually eaten cooked.

[Spanish plátano, plántano, plane tree, plantain, from Latin platanus; see plane4.]

plantain

(ˈplæntɪn; -teɪn)
n
(Plants) any of various N temperate plants of the genus Plantago, esp P. major (great plantain), which has a rosette of broad leaves and a slender spike of small greenish flowers: family Plantaginaceae. See also ribwort
[C14 plauntein, from Old French plantein, from Latin plantāgō, from planta sole of the foot]

plantain

(ˈplæntɪn; -teɪn)
n
1. (Plants) a large tropical musaceous plant, Musa paradisiaca
2. (Plants) the green-skinned banana-like fruit of this plant, eaten as a staple food in many tropical regions
[C16: from Spanish platano plantain, plane tree]

plan•tain1

(ˈplæn tɪn, -tn)

n.
1. a tropical plant, Musa paradisiaca, of the banana family, resembling the banana.
2. its fruit, cooked and eaten as a staple food in tropical regions.
[1545–55; < Sp plá(n)tano plantain, plane tree < Medieval Latin pla(n)tanus, Latin platanus plane3]

plan•tain2

(ˈplæn tɪn, -tn)

n.
any of numerous plants of the genus Plantago, of the family Plantaginaceae, esp. P. major, a weed with large, spreading basal leaves and long spikes of small flowers.
[1350–1400; Middle English plauntein < Old French plantein < Latin plantāginem, acc. of plantāgō, derivative of planta sole of the foot]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plantain - any of numerous plants of the genus Plantagoplantain - any of numerous plants of the genus Plantago; mostly small roadside or dooryard weeds with elliptic leaves and small spikes of very small flowers; seeds of some used medicinally
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
genus Plantago, Plantago - type genus of the family Plantaginaceae; large cosmopolitan genus of mostly small herbs
English plantain, narrow-leaved plantain, Plantago lanceolata, ribgrass, ribwort, ripple-grass, buckthorn - an Old World plantain with long narrow ribbed leaves widely established in temperate regions
cart-track plant, common plantain, Plantago major, white-man's foot, whiteman's foot, broad-leaved plantain - common European perennial naturalized worldwide; a troublesome weed
Plantago media, hoary plantain - widely distributed Old World perennial naturalized in North America having finely hairy leaves and inconspicuous white fragrant flowers
fleawort, Plantago psyllium, psyllium, Spanish psyllium - plantain of Mediterranean regions whose seeds swell and become gelatinous when moist and are used as a mild laxative
broad-leaved plantain, Plantago rugelii, rugel's plantain - North American plantain having reddish leafstalks and broad leaves
hoary plantain, Plantago virginica - North American annual or biennial with long soft hairs on the leaves
2.plantain - a banana tree bearing hanging clusters of edible angular greenish starchy fruitsplantain - a banana tree bearing hanging clusters of edible angular greenish starchy fruits; tropics and subtropics
plantain - starchy banana-like fruit; eaten (always cooked) as a staple vegetable throughout the tropics
banana, banana tree - any of several tropical and subtropical treelike herbs of the genus Musa having a terminal crown of large entire leaves and usually bearing hanging clusters of elongated fruits
3.plantain - starchy banana-like fruit; eaten (always cooked) as a staple vegetable throughout the tropics
veg, vegetable, veggie - edible seeds or roots or stems or leaves or bulbs or tubers or nonsweet fruits of any of numerous herbaceous plant
Musa paradisiaca, plantain tree, plantain - a banana tree bearing hanging clusters of edible angular greenish starchy fruits; tropics and subtropics
Translations
jitrocel
bakbanaan

plantain

[ˈplæntɪn] Nllantén m, plátano m (LAm)

plantain

n
(Bot) → Plantainbanane f
(= weed)Wegerich m
References in classic literature ?
said I in the gentlest voice, "the key is down by the front steps, under a plantain leaf
Squash Blossom, Blue Eye, Plantain, and Buttercup have had the scarlet fever, but came easily through it.
We haven't been able to prove cannibalism against that tribe in the courts; but when a Sheshaheli offers you four pounds of woman's breast, tattoo marks and all, skewered up in a plantain leaf before breakfast, you--"
The huge, mouse-coloured Brahmini bull of the ward was shouldering his way through the many-coloured crowd, a stolen plantain hanging out of his mouth.
Beneath him extended a country generally destitute of cultivation; only here and there some ravines seemed under tillage; the surface, dotted with peaks of medium height, grew flat as it approached the lake; barley-fields took the place of rice-plantations, and there, too, could be seen growing the species of plantain from which the wine of the country is drawn, and mwani, the wild plant which supplies a substitute for coffee.
That morning Tarzan had brought them fruit, nuts, and plantain, and now he was bringing them the flesh of his kill, while the best that they might do was to fetch water from the river.
The ape-man traveled swiftly through the forest, and about noon came to the site of the village, but to his disappointment found that the jungle had overgrown the plantain fields and that the thatched huts had fallen in decay.
Banana and plantain trees were burdened with great bunches of ripening fruit.
The neighbour ran, and in came a brisk little old lady in cap and specs, with a bundle of herbs under her arm, which she at once applied in all sorts of funny ways, explaining their virtues as she clapped a plantain poultice here, put a pounded catnip plaster there, or tied a couple of mullein leaves round the sufferer's throat.
Fruits, berries, and tender plantain found a place upon his menu in the order that he happened upon them, for he did not seek such foods.
Mango herself, of the great house of Mango, Plantain, and Co.
Why, it was really refreshing even to think of it; and so I straightway fell to picturing myself seated beneath a cocoanut tree on the brow of the mountain, with a cluster of plantains within easy reach, criticizing her nautical evolutions as she was working her way out of the harbour.