planted


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plant

 (plănt)
n.
1. Botany
a. Any of various photosynthetic, eukaryotic, multicellular organisms of the kingdom Plantae characteristically containing chloroplasts, having cell walls made of cellulose, producing embryos, and lacking the power of locomotion. Plants include trees, bushes, herbs, ferns, mosses, and certain green algae.
b. A plant having no permanent woody stem; an herb.
c. Any of various fungi, algae, or protists that resemble plants and were formerly classified in the plant kingdom. Not in scientific use.
2.
a. A building or group of buildings for the manufacture of a product; a factory: works in an auto plant.
b. The buildings, fixtures, and equipment, including machinery, tools, and instruments, necessary for an industrial operation or an institution: the university's mechanical plant.
3. A person or thing put into place in order to mislead or function secretly, especially:
a. A person placed in a group of spectators to influence behavior.
b. A person stationed in a given location as a spy or observer.
c. A misleading piece of evidence placed so as to be discovered.
d. A remark or action in a play or narrative that becomes important later.
4. Slang A scheming trick; a swindle.
tr.v. plant·ed, plant·ing, plants
1.
a. To place or set (seeds, for example) in the ground to grow.
b. To place seeds or young plants in (land); sow: plant a field in corn.
2.
a. To place (spawn or young fish) in water or an underwater bed for cultivation: plant oysters.
b. To stock with spawn or fish.
3. To introduce (an animal) into an area.
4.
a. To place or fix in a certain position: planted both feet on the ground; planted a kiss on my cheek.
b. To deliver (a punch or blow).
c. To fix firmly in the mind; implant: "The right of revolution is planted in the heart of man" (Clarence Darrow).
5. To establish; found: plant a colony.
6.
a. To station (a person) for the purpose of functioning in secret, as by observing, spying, or influencing behavior: Detectives were planted all over the store.
b. To place secretly or deceptively so as to be discovered or made public: planted a gun on the corpse to make the death look like suicide.
7. To conceal; hide: planted the stolen goods in the warehouse.

[Middle English plante, from Old English and Old French, both from Latin planta, sprout, seedling; see plat- in Indo-European roots.]

plant′a·ble adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.planted - (used especially of ideas or principles) deeply rooted; firmly fixed or held; "deep-rooted prejudice"; "deep-seated differences of opinion"; "implanted convictions"; "ingrained habits of a lifetime"; "a deeply planted need"
constituted, established - brought about or set up or accepted; especially long established; "the established social order"; "distrust the constituted authority"; "a team established as a member of a major league"; "enjoyed his prestige as an established writer"; "an established precedent"; "the established Church"
2.planted - set in the soil for growth
unplanted - not planted
References in classic literature ?
And sometimes we do," answered the Prince; "but that is considered a great misfortune, for then we must be planted at once.
I am in no hurry to resign my office and be planted, you may be sure.
But the rest of you must be destroyed in some way, and you cannot be planted, because I do not wish horses and cats and meat people growing all over our country.
If he planted you, he might grow some cat-tails," suggested the Wizard.
Meanwhile my beans, the length of whose rows, added together, was seven miles already planted, were impatient to be hoed, for the earliest had grown considerably before the latest were in the ground; indeed they were not easily to be put off.
I planted about two acres and a half of upland; and as it was only about fifteen years since the land was cleared, and I myself had got out two or three cords of stumps, I did not give it any manure; but in the course of the summer it appeared by the arrowheads which I turned up in hoeing, that an extinct nation had anciently dwelt here and planted corn and beans ere white men came to clear the land, and so, to some extent, had exhausted the soil for this very crop.
I said this to myself; but now another summer is gone, and another, and another, and I am obliged to say to you, Reader, that the seeds which I planted, if indeed they were the seeds of those virtues, were wormeaten or had lost their vitality, and so did not come up.
Two long borders were done during my absence one day, and when I explained that I should like the third to have plants in groups and not in lines, and that what I wanted was a natural effect with no bare spaces of earth to be seen, he looked even more gloomily hopeless than usual; and on my going out later on to see the result, I found he had planted two long borders down the sides of a straight walk with little lines of five plants in a row--first five pinks, and next to them five rockets, and behind the rockets five pinks, and behind the pinks five rockets, and so on with different plants of every sort and size down to the end.
While I was stooping over a group of hollyhocks planted on the top of the only thing in the shape of a hill the garden possesses, the April baby, who had been sitting pensive on a tree stump close by, got up suddenly and began to run aimlessly about, shrieking and wringing her hands with every symptom of terror.
Being thus got up, he looked out; but being dark, he could see little or nothing, and besides, the trees which I had planted, and which were now grown tall, intercepted his sight, so that he could only look up, and see that it was a starlight night, and hearing no noise, he returned and lay down again; but to no purpose; he could not compose himself to anything like rest; but his thoughts were to the last degree uneasy, and he knew not for what.
For this purpose, as I planted trees, or rather thrust in stakes, which in time all grew up to be trees, for some good distance before the entrance into my apartments, they went on in the same manner, and filled up the rest of that whole space of ground from the trees I had set quite down to the side of the creek, where I landed my floats, and even into the very ooze where the tide flowed, not so much as leaving any place to land, or any sign that there had been any landing thereabouts: these stakes also being of a wood very forward to grow, they took care to have them generally much larger and taller than those which I had planted.
Having chosen a perfect site, prepped the soil, and planted the perfect tree, bush, or vine; you might consider companion plants.