plantocracy


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plan·toc·ra·cy

 (plăn-tŏk′rə-sē)
n. pl. plan·toc·ra·cies
1. A ruling class formed of plantation owners.
2. Leadership or government by this class.

plantocracy

(plɑːnˈtɒkrəsɪ)
n, pl -cies
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a ruling social class composed of planters
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the most important members of the Bengal Photographic Society, Rajendralal Mitra was expelled by the British for making a speech at the Society against the widespread economic and archaeological destruction caused by the indigo plantocracy.
Fearing ever greater financial losses for the plantocracy should the violence continue, the British drew up a treaty with the Windward and Leeward Maroons, the latter of which included the Trelawny Town Maroons.
10) In contrast to England, Barbados remained a plantocracy whose government was controlled by the planter elite and organized around the parishes and vestries of the Anglican Church.
This picture of sedate and ordered well-being does indeed seem to depict what Moira Ferguson has called "a kinder, gentler plantocracy," a privileged vision of ease, concord, and familiarity that contrasts starkly with the squalor of Portsmouth, the decadence of London, and the otherness of an Antigua that can only be imagined by most of Mansfield's inhabitants.
20) In these shadows--where the legacy of the plantocracy underwrites and anticipates the historically present persistence of anti-black violence--we might not simply access black suffering and white supremacy but perhaps generate new ways of encountering the history of blackness.
Drawing together with the ruling plantocracy, Picton pursued his government with an authoritarian style and an easy use of violence.
This mindset was not only a luxury but a necessity, as the entire Southern plantocracy relied on the lady to represent the feminine "precious," the delicate, and the frailty valued by this system.
In Maria, Efrain leaves a decaying plantocracy to spend his formative school years in Bogota.
He also married into Jamaican plantocracy and became a slave-owner, seeing no conflict between his ownership of people and his Christianity.
Perhaps it is the landscape with its innate harshness or the oppression by the plantocracy that makes some men remain boys.
Once slavery was outlawed in the British Empire in 1833, the plantocracy demanded indentured labor.