plasma

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plas·ma

 (plăz′mə)
n. also plasm (plăz′əm)
1.
a. The clear, yellowish fluid portion of blood, lymph, or intramuscular fluid in which cells are suspended. It differs from serum in that it contains fibrin and other soluble clotting elements.
b. Blood plasma, especially when sterilized and depleted of cells for transfusion.
2. Protoplasm or cytoplasm.
3. The fluid portion of milk from which the curd has been separated by coagulation; whey.
4. Physics An electrically neutral, highly ionized phase of matter composed of ions, electrons, and neutral particles. It is distinct from solids, liquids, and gases.
adj.
Of or relating to a flat-panel display used in televisions, made up of an array of tiny cells each containing a gaseous mixture of xenon and neon that is changed into a plasma state to illuminate a phosphor coating on the inside of the cell.

[New Latin, from Late Latin, image, figure, from Greek, from plassein, to mold; see pelə- in Indo-European roots.]

plas·mat′ic (plăz-măt′ĭk), plas′mic (-mĭk) adj.

plasma

(ˈplæzmə) or

plasm

n
1. (Physiology) the clear yellowish fluid portion of blood or lymph in which the red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets are suspended
2. (Physiology) short for blood plasma
3. (Biology) a former name for protoplasm, cytoplasm
4. (Nuclear Physics) physics
a. a hot ionized material consisting of nuclei and electrons. It is sometimes regarded as a fourth state of matter and is the material present in the sun, most stars, and fusion reactors
b. the ionized gas in an electric discharge or spark, containing positive ions and electrons and a small number of negative ions together with un-ionized material
5. (Minerals) a green slightly translucent variety of chalcedony, used as a gemstone
6. (Cookery) a less common term for whey
[C18: from Late Latin: something moulded, from Greek, from plassein to mould]
plasmatic, ˈplasmic adj

plas•ma

(ˈplæz mə)

n.
1. the fluid part of blood or lymph, as distinguished from the cellular components.
3. a green, faintly translucent chalcedony.
4. a highly ionized gas containing an approximately equal number of positive ions and electrons.
Also, plasm (ˈplæz əm) (for defs. 1-3).
[1705–15; < Late Latin < Greek plásma something molded or formed, akin to plássein to form, mold. compare plastic]
plas•mat′ic (-ˈmæt ɪk) plas′mic, adj.

plas·ma

(plăz′mə)
2. Protoplasm or cytoplasm.
3. A state of matter similar to a gas but consisting of positively charged ions with most or all of their detached electrons moving freely about. Because the concentrations of free electrons and positively charged ions are nearly equal, a plasma is electrically neutral. Plasmas are produced by very high temperatures, as in the sun and other stars, and also by the ionization resulting from exposure to an electric current, as in a fluorescent light bulb or a neon sign.

plasma

1. A gas with roughly equal numbers of negative and positive ions.
2. The fluid part of blood.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plasma - the colorless watery fluid of the blood and lymph that contains no cells, but in which the blood cells (erythrocytes, leukocytes, and thrombocytes) are suspendedplasma - the colorless watery fluid of the blood and lymph that contains no cells, but in which the blood cells (erythrocytes, leukocytes, and thrombocytes) are suspended
ECF, extracellular fluid - liquid containing proteins and electrolytes including the liquid in blood plasma and interstitial fluid; "the body normally has about 15 quarts of extracellular fluid"
plasma protein - any of the proteins in blood plasma
gamma globulin, human gamma globulin - a plasma protein containing the immunoglobulins that are responsible for immune responses
2.plasma - a green slightly translucent variety of chalcedony used as a gemstone
calcedony, chalcedony - a milky or greyish translucent to transparent quartz
3.plasma - (physical chemistry) a fourth state of matter distinct from solid or liquid or gas and present in stars and fusion reactors; a gas becomes a plasma when it is heated until the atoms lose all their electrons, leaving a highly electrified collection of nuclei and free electrons; "particles in space exist in the form of a plasma"
physical chemistry - the branch of chemistry dealing with the physical properties of chemical substances
interplanetary gas - a rarefied flow of gas and charged particles (plasma) that stream from the sun and form the solar wind
state of matter, state - (chemistry) the three traditional states of matter are solids (fixed shape and volume) and liquids (fixed volume and shaped by the container) and gases (filling the container); "the solid state of water is called ice"
Translations
بْلازما
plazma
plasma
פלזמה
plazmavérplazma
blóðvökviblóîvökvirafgas
プラズマ
plazma
plazma
plasmă
plazma
blodplasmaplasma
plâzma

plasma

[ˈplæzmə]
A. Nplasma m
B. ADJ [screen, monitor, television] → de plasma

plasma

[ˈplæzmə]
n
(in blood)plasma m
(PHYSICS) (= gas) → plasma m
modif [screen, TV] → plasma m

plasma

:
plasma screen
n (TV etc) → Plasmabildschirm m
plasma TV

plasma

[ˈplæzmə] nplasma m

plasma

(ˈplӕzmə) noun
the liquid part of blood and certain other fluids produced by the body.

plas·ma

n. plasma, componente líquido de la sangre y linfa que se compone en su mayor parte (91%) de agua;
___ proteinsproteínas sanguíneas;
___ cellcélula plasmática productora de inmuno globulinas.

plasma

adj plasmático; — potassium potasio plasmático; n plasma m; fresh frozen — plasma fresco congelado
References in periodicals archive ?
These products are used as plasma volume replacement following acute (sudden) blood loss, where treatment with alternative products known as crystalloids alone is not considered to be sufficient.
Results from a post-hoc analysis of data collected in Empagliflozin Cardiovascular Outcome Event Trial in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients (EMPA-REG OUTCOME) suggest that perhaps half the heart failure benefit was attributable to what appears to have been a roughly 7% drop in plasma volume in patients treated with empagliflozin (Jardiance), which began soon after treatment started and continued through the balance of the study, David Fitchett, MD, said at the American Heart Association scientific sessions.
Chronic aerobic exercise training (8,13,19,27) and chronic high intensity interval training (3) usually elicit plasma volume (PV) expansion.
It is well documented that dehydration reduces plasma volume (12) which in turn will lead to active muscles blood flow restrictions and core temperature rising, both of which compromise athletic performance and thermal regulation during physical activity under hot conditions (13).
2003), which decreases plasma volume (a fall of 15%) during initial stages of dry forage feeding (Blair-West and Brook, 1969).
It is usually carried out using an automated blood cell separator to ensure fluid balance and maintain a normal plasma volume.
Water is needed to form amniotic fluid that surrounds the baby, support the increase in blood plasma volume and produce breast milk.
As part of the agreement, PCI will receive Daxor's BVA-100 Blood Volume Analyzer, an instrument which enables semi-automated measurement of a patient's total blood volume, red blood cell volume and plasma volume.
Increased plasma volume results in generalized hemodilution which is a patient-related variable.
BioTime is focused on regenerative medicine and blood plasma volume expanders.
In a statement which Ricky Gervais's David Brent couldn't better, experts explained: "The shift in the current paradigm regarding the 'acceptance' of thirst as the body's inherent guide governing fluid balance centers (sic) around the acknowledgment of current scientific evidence supporting the body's regulation of plasma osmolality (body sodium) over plasma volume instead of bodyweight during exercise.
RNA was extracted from 1 aliquot with 1 mL of the aqueous layer (equivalent to an original plasma volume of 727 [micro]L) by the MagNA Pure Kit and instrument and eluted into 50 [micro]L of elution buffer.