plasma

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plas·ma

 (plăz′mə)
n. also plasm (plăz′əm)
1.
a. The clear, yellowish fluid portion of blood, lymph, or intramuscular fluid in which cells are suspended. It differs from serum in that it contains fibrin and other soluble clotting elements.
b. Blood plasma, especially when sterilized and depleted of cells for transfusion.
2. Protoplasm or cytoplasm.
3. The fluid portion of milk from which the curd has been separated by coagulation; whey.
4. Physics An electrically neutral, highly ionized phase of matter composed of ions, electrons, and neutral particles. It is distinct from solids, liquids, and gases.
adj.
Of or relating to a flat-panel display used in televisions, made up of an array of tiny cells each containing a gaseous mixture of xenon and neon that is changed into a plasma state to illuminate a phosphor coating on the inside of the cell.

[New Latin, from Late Latin, image, figure, from Greek, from plassein, to mold; see pelə- in Indo-European roots.]

plas·mat′ic (plăz-măt′ĭk), plas′mic (-mĭk) adj.

plasma

(ˈplæzmə) or

plasm

n
1. (Physiology) the clear yellowish fluid portion of blood or lymph in which the red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets are suspended
2. (Physiology) short for blood plasma
3. (Biology) a former name for protoplasm, cytoplasm
4. (Nuclear Physics) physics
a. a hot ionized material consisting of nuclei and electrons. It is sometimes regarded as a fourth state of matter and is the material present in the sun, most stars, and fusion reactors
b. the ionized gas in an electric discharge or spark, containing positive ions and electrons and a small number of negative ions together with un-ionized material
5. (Minerals) a green slightly translucent variety of chalcedony, used as a gemstone
6. (Cookery) a less common term for whey
[C18: from Late Latin: something moulded, from Greek, from plassein to mould]
plasmatic, ˈplasmic adj

plas•ma

(ˈplæz mə)

n.
1. the fluid part of blood or lymph, as distinguished from the cellular components.
3. a green, faintly translucent chalcedony.
4. a highly ionized gas containing an approximately equal number of positive ions and electrons.
Also, plasm (ˈplæz əm) (for defs. 1-3).
[1705–15; < Late Latin < Greek plásma something molded or formed, akin to plássein to form, mold. compare plastic]
plas•mat′ic (-ˈmæt ɪk) plas′mic, adj.

plas·ma

(plăz′mə)
2. Protoplasm or cytoplasm.
3. A state of matter similar to a gas but consisting of positively charged ions with most or all of their detached electrons moving freely about. Because the concentrations of free electrons and positively charged ions are nearly equal, a plasma is electrically neutral. Plasmas are produced by very high temperatures, as in the sun and other stars, and also by the ionization resulting from exposure to an electric current, as in a fluorescent light bulb or a neon sign.

plasma

1. A gas with roughly equal numbers of negative and positive ions.
2. The fluid part of blood.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plasma - the colorless watery fluid of the blood and lymph that contains no cells, but in which the blood cells (erythrocytes, leukocytes, and thrombocytes) are suspendedplasma - the colorless watery fluid of the blood and lymph that contains no cells, but in which the blood cells (erythrocytes, leukocytes, and thrombocytes) are suspended
ECF, extracellular fluid - liquid containing proteins and electrolytes including the liquid in blood plasma and interstitial fluid; "the body normally has about 15 quarts of extracellular fluid"
plasma protein - any of the proteins in blood plasma
gamma globulin, human gamma globulin - a plasma protein containing the immunoglobulins that are responsible for immune responses
2.plasma - a green slightly translucent variety of chalcedony used as a gemstone
calcedony, chalcedony - a milky or greyish translucent to transparent quartz
3.plasma - (physical chemistry) a fourth state of matter distinct from solid or liquid or gas and present in stars and fusion reactors; a gas becomes a plasma when it is heated until the atoms lose all their electrons, leaving a highly electrified collection of nuclei and free electrons; "particles in space exist in the form of a plasma"
physical chemistry - the branch of chemistry dealing with the physical properties of chemical substances
interplanetary gas - a rarefied flow of gas and charged particles (plasma) that stream from the sun and form the solar wind
state of matter, state - (chemistry) the three traditional states of matter are solids (fixed shape and volume) and liquids (fixed volume and shaped by the container) and gases (filling the container); "the solid state of water is called ice"
Translations
بْلازما
plazma
plasma
פלזמה
plazmavérplazma
blóðvökviblóîvökvirafgas
プラズマ
plazma
plazma
plasmă
plazma
blodplasmaplasma
plâzma

plasma

[ˈplæzmə]
A. Nplasma m
B. ADJ [screen, monitor, television] → de plasma

plasma

[ˈplæzmə]
n
(in blood)plasma m
(PHYSICS) (= gas) → plasma m
modif [screen, TV] → plasma m

plasma

:
plasma screen
n (TV etc) → Plasmabildschirm m
plasma TV

plasma

[ˈplæzmə] nplasma m

plasma

(ˈplӕzmə) noun
the liquid part of blood and certain other fluids produced by the body.

plas·ma

n. plasma, componente líquido de la sangre y linfa que se compone en su mayor parte (91%) de agua;
___ proteinsproteínas sanguíneas;
___ cellcélula plasmática productora de inmuno globulinas.

plasma

adj plasmático; — potassium potasio plasmático; n plasma m; fresh frozen — plasma fresco congelado
References in periodicals archive ?
Topics include elementary processes and general theories of plasma phenomena, plasmas in tokamaks, stellators and related experiments, plasmas produced by z-pinch and plasma-focus discharges, plasmas produced by intense laser beams, plasmas of microwave and glow discharges, plasmas in spark and arc discharges, plasmas in space, diagnostic methods and experimental facilities, and applications of quasi- stationary and pulsed plasmas.
Ransom University d'Orleans; and "Broad band UV absorption of silicone etching plasmas," M.
ALTERNATIVE TO PLASMAS Documented sightings of ball lightning date back to the Middle Ages.
Familiar plasmas are relatively hot, such as in the solar corona (1 000 000 K), fluorescent light bulbs (10 000 K), or the ionosphere around the Earth (1000 K).
Coronas, also known as "atmospheric" or "nonvacuum" plasmas, are ionized gases created by electricity passing through air.
This new client has requested that during 1992 NABI provide certain hyperimmune plasmas to be used to produce Rho(D) immune globulin for the treatment and prevention of hemolytic disease of fetuses and newborns resulting from Rh incompatibility; rabies immune globulin for passive immunization subsequent to exposure to rabies; and Hepatits B immune globulin for passive immunization subsequent to exposure to Hepatitis B.
This pioneering book provides an essential guide to both the technology and science related to plasmas and its practical applications in the textile industry.
These forces shear the electrons from atoms in ordinary gases, transforming the gases into clouds of charged particles called plasmas.
This proprietary technology is designed to safely clean the millions of laptops, computers, LCDs, Plasmas, PSPs and other consumer devices that top this season's Holiday wish lists.
The physics of how the plasmas from the individual wires form and merge to create a cylindrically symmetric plasma is not understood in detail," Hammer points out.
The plasmas take advantage of Pioneer's new PureDrive[TM] Pro circuitry, available exclusively in the new professional displays, in addition to proprietary technologies to deliver brilliant, sharp imagery with improved panel efficiency.
Industrial researchers have long studied the behavior of dust particles suspended in the electrically charged gases, or plasmas, often used in micro-electronics fabrication.