plaster of Paris


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plaster of Paris

n.
Any of a group of gypsum cements, essentially hemihydrated calcium sulfate, CaSO4· 1/2 H2O, a white powder that forms a paste when it is mixed with water and then hardens into a solid, used in making casts, molds, and sculpture.

[Middle English, after Paris2France.]

plaster of Paris

n
1. a white powder that sets to a hard solid when mixed with water, used for making sculptures and casts, as an additive for lime plasters, and for making casts for setting broken limbs. It is usually the hemihydrate of calcium sulphate, 2CaSO4.H2O
2. the hard plaster produced when this powder is mixed with water: a fully hydrated form of calcium sulphate
Sometimes shortened to: plaster
[C15: from Medieval Latin plastrum parisiense, originally made from the gypsum of Paris]

plas′ter of Par′is

(or par′is),


n.
calcined gypsum in white, powdery form, used as a base for gypsum plasters, as an additive of lime plasters, and as a material for fine and ornamental casts.
[1375–1425; so called because prepared from the gypsum of Paris, France]

plas·ter of Paris

(plăs′tər)
A form of calcium phosphate derived from the mineral gypsum. It is mixed with water to make casts and molds.

plaster of Paris

- So called because it is prepared from the gypsum of Paris, France.
See also related terms for plaster.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plaster of Paris - any of several gypsum cements; a white powder (a form of calcium sulphate) that forms a paste when mixed with water and hardens into a solid; used in making molds and sculptures and casts for broken limbs
gesso - gypsum or plaster of Paris spread on a surface to make it suitable for painting or gilding (or a surface so prepared)
gypsum - a common white or colorless mineral (hydrated calcium sulphate) used to make cements and plasters (especially plaster of Paris)
calcium sulfate, calcium sulphate - a white salt (CaSO4)
Translations

plaster of Paris

ngesso
References in classic literature ?
He'll always be lame," the surgeon said, wiping his hands and gazing down at Michael, who lay, for the most part of him, a motionless prisoner set in plaster of Paris.
Against one wall was a plaster of Paris plaque of an O'Callahan in a Roman helmet.
I saw iron ladles, pans full of white sand, files with white metal left glittering in their teeth, molds of plaster of Paris, bags containing the same material in powder, a powerful machine with the name and use of which I was theoretically not unacquainted, white metal in a partially-fused state, bottles of aquafortis, dies scattered over a dresser, crucibles, sandpaper, bars of metal, and edged tools in plenty, of the strangest construction.
Of course it had not the least effect, except upon a few roaches which had the misfortune to drink water after eating it, and so got their inwards set in a coating of plaster of Paris.
Here is my monograph upon the tracing of footsteps, with some remarks upon the uses of plaster of Paris as a preserver of impresses.
The cast was taken in two moulds from each side of the face, and then these two profiles of plaster of Paris were joined together to make the complete bust.
But a moment ago, as it seemed to me, I had been gazing upward at the stars and listening to the dear, minute sounds of peace; and in another the great gray slate was clean, and every bone of me set in plaster of Paris, and sniping beginning between pickets with the day.
The plant will be designed to achieve a capacity of eight million square metres of Gypsum board and 200,000t of plaster of Paris per annum in the first phase, scaling up to 16m square metres of board in a second phase in accordance with demand.
I portion out the 3:1 mix and put it in an empty coffee can and shake it real good so the Plaster of Paris coats and infuses the oatmeal completely.
He said this case had led to widespread reappraisal of the dangers of plaster of Paris in schools and other organisations.
A SCHOOL has been ordered to pay pounds 19,000 after a 16-year-old girl lost most of her fingers when she put her hands in a bucket of plaster of Paris during a school art lesson.
Moreover, this product can be used on wood finishes, plaster of Paris and clay accessories which are growing industries.