plasticity


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plas·tic

 (plăs′tĭk)
adj.
1. Capable of being shaped or formed: plastic material such as clay. See Synonyms at malleable.
2. Relating to or dealing with shaping or modeling: the plastic art of sculpture.
3. Having the qualities of sculpture; well-formed: "the astonishing plastic beauty of the chorus girls" (Frank Harris).
4. Giving form or shape to a substance: the plastic forces that create and wear down a mountain range.
5. Easily influenced; impressionable: "The plastic mind of the bank clerk had been ... distorted by what he had read" (Rudyard Kipling).
6. Made of a plastic or plastics: a plastic garden hose.
7. Physics Capable of undergoing continuous deformation without rupture or relaxation.
8. Biology
a. Capable of building tissue; formative.
b. Able to change and adapt, especially by acquiring alternative pathways for sensory perception or motor skills. Used of the central nervous system.
9. Marked by artificiality or superficiality: a plastic world of fad, hype, and sensation.
10. Informal Of or obtained by means of credit cards: plastic money.
n.
1. Any of various organic compounds produced by polymerization, capable of being molded, extruded, cast into various shapes and films, or drawn into filaments used as textile fibers.
2. Informal A credit card or credit cards: would accept cash or plastic in payment.

[Latin plasticus, from Greek plastikos, from plastos, molded, from plassein, to mold; see pelə- in Indo-European roots.]

plas′ti·cal·ly adv.
plas·tic′i·ty (-tĭs′ĭ-tē) n.

plasticity

(plæˈstɪsɪtɪ)
n
1. the quality of being plastic or able to be moulded
2. (Art Terms) (in pictorial art) the quality of depicting space and form so that they appear three-dimensional

plas•tic•i•ty

(plæˈstɪs ɪ ti)

n.
1. the quality or state of being plastic.
2. the capability of being molded: the plasticity of clay.
[1775–85]

plasticity

the property of a substance that makes it capable of being molded, given shape, or being made to assume a desired form. — plastic, adj.
See also: Materials, Properties of
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plasticity - the property of being physically malleableplasticity - the property of being physically malleable; the property of something that can be worked or hammered or shaped without breaking
physical property - any property used to characterize matter and energy and their interactions
ductileness, ductility - the malleability of something that can be drawn into threads or wires or hammered into thin sheets
flexibility, flexibleness - the property of being flexible; easily bent or shaped

plasticity

noun pliability, flexibility, suppleness, malleability, pliableness The new insulating compound demonstrated remarkable plasticity.

plasticity

noun
Translations

plasticity

[plæsˈtɪsɪtɪ] Nplasticidad f

plasticity

nFormbarkeit f, → Modellierbarkeit f

plasticity

[plæsˈtɪsɪtɪ] nplasticità

plas·tic·i·ty

n. plasticidad, capacidad para moldearse.
References in classic literature ?
It was another instance of the plasticity of his clay, of his capacity for being moulded by the pressure of environment.
To that, to the study of the plasticity of living forms, my life has been devoted.
I wanted--it was the one thing I wanted--to find out the extreme limit of plasticity in a living shape.
Before he arose to the surface from that first plunge into the underworld he discovered that he was a good actor and demonstrated the plasticity of his nature.
Cellular plasticity is the ability of a cell to make different cell types.
Artificial sensation through stimulation - synaptic plasticity - is responsible for the retaining memories in the brain.
Synaptic plasticity is responsible for the storing of memories in the memory structures of the brain: During that process the communication between neurons is altered by means of a process called synaptic plasticity, so that a memory is created.
Their topics include a theoretical model of state transition of CaM-dependent protein kinase II, the bi-directionality of synaptic pathways related to long-term potentiation and long-term depression, the uncertainty quantification of models related to synaptic plasticity, and synaptic plasticity in dementia: Alzheimer's disease and the role of calcium.
Such signals can potentially trigger synaptic plasticity by releasing neurochemicals that reorganize neural connections in response to specific experiences.
Scientists have been surprised by the discovery that magnesium plays an essential role in supporting brain plasticity, which is the sign of a youthful, flexible brain primed for optimal learning, memory, and cognitive function.
Part 1 'The Changing face of intervention in infants with cerebral palsy' sets the tone of the text with a brief historical context which leads into discussion on understanding weakness due to impaired muscle activation and lack of motor control; advances in diagnosis, brain plasticity, motor development and active learning and skill acquisition.
Phenotypic plasticity in response to environmental heterogeneity is an important adaptive component of plant strategies.