plastination


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Related to plastination: embalming

plastination

(ˌplæstɪˈneɪʃən)
n
a technique for embalming bodies by impregnating whole organs with silicon polymers
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plastination - a process involving fixation and dehydration and forced impregnation and hardening of biological tissues; water and lipids are replaced by curable polymers (silicone or epoxy or polyester) that are subsequently hardened; "the plastination of specimens is valuable for research and teaching"
fixation, fixing - (histology) the preservation and hardening of a tissue sample to retain as nearly as possible the same relations they had in the living body
drying up, evaporation, desiccation, dehydration - the process of extracting moisture
curing, solidification, solidifying, hardening, set - the process of becoming hard or solid by cooling or drying or crystallization; "the hardening of concrete"; "he tested the set of the glue"
saturation, impregnation - the process of totally saturating something with a substance; "the impregnation of wood with preservative"; "the saturation of cotton with ether"
preservation - a process that saves organic substances from decay
References in periodicals archive ?
Plastination laboratory in department of anatomy is first in the whole country.
The specimens are preserved through Plastination, a remarkable scientific process invented by pioneering anatomist Dr.
To date, more than 14,000 donors around the world have bequeathed their bodies to Dr von Hagens' Institute for Plastination after death.
MUNICH, July 23, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Anatomist Gunther von Hagens, who is inextricably linked to contemporary artistic anatomy rendered through his science of Plastination, has charted a new course in anatomical art with his latest work, Cuts: Forays In Anatomical Art.
For the first episode listeners are taken to Body Worlds, a traveling exhibition of preserved human bodies and body parts that are prepared using a technique called plastination.
Von Hagens, who relies solely on donated specimens, spent three years creating the 12-foot tall horse-and-rider statue through a plastination process.
Gunther von Hagens developed plastination as a technique of tissue preservation in 1977.
Since the first controversial public showing in Manheim's Museum for Technology and Labour 15 years ago, more than 13 000 people have signed up to donate their bodies for plastination, inspired by Body Worlds--dubbed the most successful touring exhibition ever (35 million viewers).
The items on display are real human specimens donated by people who bequeathed their bodies for educational purposes to the Institute for Plastination in Germany.
The technique, called plastination, was created by Gunther von Hagens, and is usually used on human forms.
of Missouri at Kansas City/Children's Mercy Bioethics Center, Children's Mercy Hospital) introduces a dozen essays (many first presented at a Center for Bioethics conference held in Kansas in 2008) that discuss the development of plastination, historical attitudes toward treating human remains, and issues concerning commercialization and detachment in a biotechnological era.
Professor of clinical anatomy at Warwick Medical School, Peter Abrahams, said: "We have a huge collection of human body parts that have been dissected and put through the process of plastination, so they are dry, non-smelly, non-decomposing - they'll last forever.