plated


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

plat·ed

 (plā′tĭd)
adj.
1. Coated with a thin adherent layer of metal. Often used in combination: a gold-plated ceramic bowl; a silver-plated pen.
2. Covered with protective plates or sheets of metal. Often used in combination: an armor-plated truck; a steel-plated safe.

plated

(ˈpleɪtɪd)
adj
1. (Metallurgy)
a. coated with a layer of metal
b. (in combination): gold-plated.
2. (Textiles) (of a fabric) knitted in two different yarns so that one appears on the face and the other on the back
Translations
مُغَطّى بطَبَقَةٍ مَعْدَنِيَّه
plátovaný
=-belagtbelagt
fémmel bevont
málmhúîaîur
plátovanýpokovovaný

plated

[ˈpleɪtɪd] ADJ
1. [metal, jewellery] → chapado (with en) (with nickel) → niquelado
2. (= armoured) → blindado

plated

[ˈpleɪtɪd] adjplaqué(e)
plated with 24-carat gold → plaqué à l'or 24 carats

plate

(pleit) noun
1. a shallow dish for holding food etc. china plates.
2. a sheet of metal etc. The ship was built of steel plates.
3. articles made of, or plated with, usually gold or silver. a collection of gold plate.
4. a flat piece of metal inscribed with eg a name, for fixing to a door, or with a design etc, for use in printing.
5. an illustration in a book, usually on glossy paper. The book has ten full-colour plates.
6. (also dental plate) a piece of plastic that fits in the mouth with false teeth attached to it.
7. a sheet of glass etc coated with a sensitive film, used in photography.
ˈplated adjective
covered with a thin layer of a different metal. gold-plated dishes.
ˈplateful noun
the complete contents of a plate. a plateful of potatoes; two platefuls of chips.
ˈplating noun
a thin covering of metal. silver-plating.
plate glass
a kind of glass made in thick sheets for windows, mirrors etc.
References in classic literature ?
He went to Black Hawk and bought her a set of plated silver in a purple velvet box, good enough for her station.
Clouded cotton stockings, and shoes, on one of the latter of which was a plated spur, completed the costume of the lower extremity of this figure, no curve or angle of which was concealed, but, on the other hand, studiously exhibited, through the vanity or simplicity of its owner.
Then who can hope to know what my feelings were, to hear this armor- plated ass start in on it again, in the murky twilight of tradition, before the dawn of history, while even Lactantius might be referred to as "the late Lactan- tius," and the Crusades wouldn't be born for five hundred years yet?