platitude


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plat·i·tude

 (plăt′ĭ-to͞od′, -tyo͞od′)
n.
1. A trite or banal remark or statement, especially one expressed as if it were original or significant. See Synonyms at cliché.
2. Lack of originality; triteness: "a passage of platitude which no critical prejudgment can force us to admire" (Edgar Allan Poe).

[French, from plat, flat, from Old French; see plate.]

plat′i·tu′di·nous (-to͞od′n-əs, -tyo͞od′-), plat′i·tu′di·nal (-to͞od′n-əl, -tyo͞od′-) adj.
plat′i·tu′di·nous·ly adv.

platitude

(ˈplætɪˌtjuːd)
n
1. a trite, dull, or obvious remark or statement; a commonplace
2. staleness or insipidity of thought or language; triteness
[C19: from French, literally: flatness, from plat flat]
ˌplatiˈtudinous adj

plat•i•tude

(ˈplæt ɪˌtud, -ˌtyud)

n.
1. a dull or trite remark, esp. one uttered as if it were fresh or profound.
2. the quality or state of being dull or trite.
[1805–15; < French: literally, flatness =plat flat (see plate) + -itude (as in French latitude, etc.) < Latin -i- -i- + -tūdō, s. -tūdin- -tude]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.platitude - a trite or obvious remark
comment, remark, input - a statement that expresses a personal opinion or belief or adds information; "from time to time she contributed a personal comment on his account"
truism - an obvious truth

platitude

noun cliché, stereotype, commonplace, banality, truism, bromide, verbiage, inanity, trite remark, hackneyed saying politicians spouting the same old platitudes

platitude

noun
A trite expression or idea:
Translations
banalitaklišé
klisee

platitude

[ˈplætɪtjuːd] Ntópico m, lugar m común
it is a platitude to say thates un tópico decir que ...

platitude

[ˈplætɪtjuːd] nplatitude f

platitude

n (pej)Platitüde f, → Plattheit f

platitude

[ˈplætɪtjuːd] nluogo comune, banalità f inv
References in classic literature ?
In modern life nothing produces such an effect as a good platitude.
After a passage of what we feel to be true poetry, there follows, inevitably, a passage of platitude which no critical prejudgment can force us to admire; but if, upon completing the work, we read it again, omitting the first book -- that is to say, commencing with the second -- we shall be surprised at now finding that admirable which we before condemned -- that damnable which we had previously so much admired.
Yet whatever her impression may have been she produced instead a vague platitude.
A trite platitude about his not caring to lose her was on his lips, but he refrained from uttering it.
Discovering that I could find no really telling stupidity, I turned to the next best thing; a platitude.
He had the appearance of a man from whom you would expect sound advice, moral sentiments, with perhaps a platitude or two thrown in on occasion, not from a desire to dazzle, but from honest conviction.
Even for his classroom he had no platitudes, no stock of professorial anecdotes.
We call it War, and pass it by--but do not put me off with platitudes and conventions--come with me, come with me--realize it
One always fears that the platform may sink under the weight of youthful platitudes uttered on such occasions; yet one can never be properly critical, because the sight of the boys and girls themselves, those young and hopeful makers of to-morrow, disarms one's scorn.
She seized upon Athanase, and began to lecture him with the queerest platitudes about royalist politics and religious morality.
As D'Artagnan delighted, both from pleasure and system, in making people talk about things which interested him, he fenced in his best style with Master Bazin, but it was pure loss of time; beyond the tiresome and hyperbolical praises of monsieur le surintendant of the finances, Bazin, who, on his side, was on his guard, afforded nothing but platitudes to the curiosity of D'Artagnan, so that our musketeer, in a tolerably bad humor, desired to go to bed as soon as he had supped.
The nervous fatigue of this existence, the insincerities and platitudes which I had to live through twice over--through my inner and outward sense--would have been maddening to me, if I had not had that sort of intoxicated callousness which came from the delights of a first passion.