platitude

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plat·i·tude

 (plăt′ĭ-to͞od′, -tyo͞od′)
n.
1. A trite or banal remark or statement, especially one expressed as if it were original or significant. See Synonyms at cliché.
2. Lack of originality; triteness: "a passage of platitude which no critical prejudgment can force us to admire" (Edgar Allan Poe).

[French, from plat, flat, from Old French; see plate.]

plat′i·tu′di·nous (-to͞od′n-əs, -tyo͞od′-), plat′i·tu′di·nal (-to͞od′n-əl, -tyo͞od′-) adj.
plat′i·tu′di·nous·ly adv.

platitude

(ˈplætɪˌtjuːd)
n
1. a trite, dull, or obvious remark or statement; a commonplace
2. staleness or insipidity of thought or language; triteness
[C19: from French, literally: flatness, from plat flat]
ˌplatiˈtudinous adj

plat•i•tude

(ˈplæt ɪˌtud, -ˌtyud)

n.
1. a dull or trite remark, esp. one uttered as if it were fresh or profound.
2. the quality or state of being dull or trite.
[1805–15; < French: literally, flatness =plat flat (see plate) + -itude (as in French latitude, etc.) < Latin -i- -i- + -tūdō, s. -tūdin- -tude]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.platitude - a trite or obvious remark
comment, remark, input - a statement that expresses a personal opinion or belief or adds information; "from time to time she contributed a personal comment on his account"
truism - an obvious truth

platitude

noun cliché, stereotype, commonplace, banality, truism, bromide, verbiage, inanity, trite remark, hackneyed saying politicians spouting the same old platitudes

platitude

noun
A trite expression or idea:
Translations
banalitaklišé
klisee

platitude

[ˈplætɪtjuːd] Ntópico m, lugar m común
it is a platitude to say thates un tópico decir que ...

platitude

[ˈplætɪtjuːd] nplatitude f

platitude

n (pej)Platitüde f, → Plattheit f

platitude

[ˈplætɪtjuːd] nluogo comune, banalità f inv
References in classic literature ?
Even for his classroom he had no platitudes, no stock of professorial anecdotes.
We call it War, and pass it by--but do not put me off with platitudes and conventions--come with me, come with me--realize it
One always fears that the platform may sink under the weight of youthful platitudes uttered on such occasions; yet one can never be properly critical, because the sight of the boys and girls themselves, those young and hopeful makers of to-morrow, disarms one's scorn.
She seized upon Athanase, and began to lecture him with the queerest platitudes about royalist politics and religious morality.
As D'Artagnan delighted, both from pleasure and system, in making people talk about things which interested him, he fenced in his best style with Master Bazin, but it was pure loss of time; beyond the tiresome and hyperbolical praises of monsieur le surintendant of the finances, Bazin, who, on his side, was on his guard, afforded nothing but platitudes to the curiosity of D'Artagnan, so that our musketeer, in a tolerably bad humor, desired to go to bed as soon as he had supped.
The nervous fatigue of this existence, the insincerities and platitudes which I had to live through twice over--through my inner and outward sense--would have been maddening to me, if I had not had that sort of intoxicated callousness which came from the delights of a first passion.
This is wanting in the police report, where more stress is laid, perhaps, upon the platitudes of the magistrate than upon the details, which to an observer contain the vital essence of the whole matter.
This struck from all three allusions to Edgar Poe and Jules Verne, and such platitudes as naturally rise to the lips of the most intelligent when they are talking against time, and dealing with a new invention in which it would seem ingenuous to believe too soon; and the question of the telephone carried them safely back to the big house.
I love them for their witless platitudes, for their supernatural ability to bore, for their delightful asinine vanity, for their luxuriant fertility of imagination, for their startling, their brilliant, their overwhelming mendacity!
Formal platitudes were manufactured with effort, but Willoughby was kindled.
But in Martin's estimation the whole tribe of bank cashiers fell a few hundred per cent, and for the rest of the evening he labored under the impression that bank cashiers and talkers of platitudes were synonymous phrases.
It recrudesced the laughter and the song, and put a lilt into my own imagination so that I could laugh and sing and say foolish things with the liveliest of them, or platitudes with verve and intensity to the satisfaction of the pompous mediocre ones who knew no other way to talk.