platitude

(redirected from platitudinising)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.

plat·i·tude

 (plăt′ĭ-to͞od′, -tyo͞od′)
n.
1. A trite or banal remark or statement, especially one expressed as if it were original or significant. See Synonyms at cliché.
2. Lack of originality; triteness: "a passage of platitude which no critical prejudgment can force us to admire" (Edgar Allan Poe).

[French, from plat, flat, from Old French; see plate.]

plat′i·tu′di·nous (-to͞od′n-əs, -tyo͞od′-), plat′i·tu′di·nal (-to͞od′n-əl, -tyo͞od′-) adj.
plat′i·tu′di·nous·ly adv.

platitude

(ˈplætɪˌtjuːd)
n
1. a trite, dull, or obvious remark or statement; a commonplace
2. staleness or insipidity of thought or language; triteness
[C19: from French, literally: flatness, from plat flat]
ˌplatiˈtudinous adj

plat•i•tude

(ˈplæt ɪˌtud, -ˌtyud)

n.
1. a dull or trite remark, esp. one uttered as if it were fresh or profound.
2. the quality or state of being dull or trite.
[1805–15; < French: literally, flatness =plat flat (see plate) + -itude (as in French latitude, etc.) < Latin -i- -i- + -tūdō, s. -tūdin- -tude]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.platitude - a trite or obvious remark
comment, remark, input - a statement that expresses a personal opinion or belief or adds information; "from time to time she contributed a personal comment on his account"
truism - an obvious truth

platitude

noun cliché, stereotype, commonplace, banality, truism, bromide, verbiage, inanity, trite remark, hackneyed saying politicians spouting the same old platitudes

platitude

noun
A trite expression or idea:
Translations
banalitaklišé
klisee

platitude

[ˈplætɪtjuːd] Ntópico m, lugar m común
it is a platitude to say thates un tópico decir que ...

platitude

[ˈplætɪtjuːd] nplatitude f

platitude

n (pej)Platitüde f, → Plattheit f

platitude

[ˈplætɪtjuːd] nluogo comune, banalità f inv
References in periodicals archive ?
HAV AVA ING worked in the Civil Service for 40 years I am familiar with the type of fob-off letter, full of platitudinising verbiage and irrelevant comments, from the vacuous and vacillating Prime Minister David Cameron to J421 campaigner Julie Hambleton (Mail, January 12).
If it didn't sound like platitudinising, I would say that that his undisguisedly monodic Chramove solo [Temple Solo] was outstanding for its purity and well thought out, elegant simplicity.
But Shakespeare gave these lines to Polonius to illustrate the platitudinising of a fool.