platoon

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pla·toon

 (plə-to͞on′)
n.
1. A subdivision of a company of troops consisting of two or more squads or sections and usually commanded by a lieutenant.
2. A group of people working, traveling, or assembled together: a platoon of firefighters; buses carrying platoons of tourists.
3. Sports A group of players within a team, especially a football team, that is trained and sent into or withdrawn from play as a unit: the defensive platoon.
v. pla·tooned, pla·toon·ing, pla·toons Sports
v.tr.
To play (a player) in alternation with another player in the same position: platooned the two catchers.
v.intr.
1. To use alternate players at the same position.
2. To take turns playing a position with another player.

[French peloton, from Old French, diminutive of pelote, ball; see pellet.]

platoon

(pləˈtuːn)
n
1. (Military) military a subunit of a company usually comprising three sections of ten to twelve men: commanded by a lieutenant
2. a group or unit of people, esp one sharing a common activity, characteristic, etc
[C17: from French peloton little ball, group of men, from pelote ball; see pellet]

pla•toon

(pləˈtun)

n.
1. a military unit consisting of two or more squads or sections and a headquarters.
2. a small unit of a police force.
3. a company or group: a platoon of visitors.
4. Football. a group of players specially trained in one aspect of the game, as offense or defense.
v.t.
5. Sports.
a. to use (a player) at a position in a game alternately with another player.
b. to alternate (two different teams or units).
v.i.
6. Sports.
a. to alternate at a position with another player.
b. to use players alternately at the same position.
c. to alternate different teams.
[1630–40; earlier plotton < French peloton little ball, group, platoon, diminutive of pelote ball. See pellet, -oon]

Platoon

 a squad; a company or set of people, 1711; a small body of soldiers; a burst of gunfire or the like.
Examples: platoon of arguments, 1775; of gunfire (a volley), 1747; of musketeers, 1637; of people, 1841; of troops, 1727.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.platoon - a military unit that is a subdivision of a companyplatoon - a military unit that is a subdivision of a company; usually has a headquarters and two or more squads; usually commanded by a lieutenant
army unit - a military unit that is part of an army
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
company - small military unit; usually two or three platoons
2.platoon - a team of policemen working under the military platoon system
police squad, squad - a small squad of policemen trained to deal with a particular kind of crime
section - a small team of policemen working as part of a police platoon
3.platoon - a group of persons who are engaged in a common activity; "platoons of tourists poured out of the busses"; "the defensive platoon of the football team"
social group - people sharing some social relation

platoon

noun squad, company, group, team, outfit (informal), patrol, squadron a platoon of armed soldiers
Translations
فَصيلَة من الجُنْد
četarota
deling
joukkue
flokksdeild
vads

platoon

[pləˈtuːn] N (Mil) → pelotón m, sección f

platoon

[pləˈtuːn]
nsection f
modif [commander, leader] → de section

platoon

n (Mil) → Zug m

platoon

[pləˈtuːn] n (Mil) → plotone m

platoon

(pləˈtuːn) noun
a section of a company of soldiers.
References in classic literature ?
Lots of people shrieked, women curled up and quit in every direction, foundlings collapsed by platoons.
I mentioned this noble idea to Harris, with enthusiasm, and was about to order the Expedition to form on the Gorner Grat, with their umbrellas, and prepare for flight by platoons, each platoon in command of a guide, when Harris stopped me and urged me not to be too hasty.
This is played by two parties drawn out in opposite platoons before a blazing fire.
There was a good deal of difficulty in getting all the platoons (there were six) to look the same way; but, by the time they reached the defile of the bridge, the troops were in sufficiently compact order.
The warriors on foot came first, in platoons of ten or twelve abreast; then the horsemen.
Now his boy was dead - lost at sea, as it might have been a Swede sailor from one of Cheyne's big tea-ships; the wife was dying, or worse; he himself was trodden down by platoons of women and doctors and maids and attendants; worried almost beyond endurance by the shift and change of her poor restless whims; hopeless, with no heart to meet his many enemies.
I divided the forces into divisions, regiments, battalions, companies, and even to platoons and sections, appointing the full complement of officers and noncommissioned officers.
You may see whole platoons of snow cowering behind a bit of broken wall.
They would have a wonderful wedding--dozens of clergymen, scores of organs playing 'The Voice that Breathed o'er Eden,' platoons of bridesmaids, wagonloads of cake.
When the ship rolled to starboard the whole platoon of dancers came charging down to starboard with it, and brought up in mass at the rail; and when it rolled to port they went floundering down to port with the same unanimity of sentiment.
Captain," said Biscarrat, "I beg to be allowed to march at the head of the first platoon.
Though neither the German cleaning his cowshed nor Rostov back with his platoon from foraging for hay had any reason for rejoicing, they looked at each other with joyful delight and brotherly love, wagged their heads in token of their mutual affection, and parted smiling, the German returning to his cowshed and Rostov going to the cottage he occupied with Denisov.