plausibly


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plau·si·ble

 (plô′zə-bəl)
adj.
1. Seemingly or apparently valid, likely, or acceptable; credible: a plausible excuse.
2. Persuasive or ingratiating, especially in an effort to deceive.

[Latin plausibilis, deserving applause, from plausus, past participle of plaudere, to applaud.]

plau′si·bil′i·ty, plau′si·ble·ness n.
plau′si·bly adv.
Synonyms: plausible, believable, credible
These adjectives mean appearing to merit belief or acceptance: a plausible pretext; a believable excuse; a credible assertion.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.plausibly - easy to believe on the basis of available evidence; "he talked plausibly before the committee"; "he will probably win the election"
Translations

plausibly

[ˈplɔːzəblɪ] ADVde modo verosímil, de forma plausible
he tells it most plausiblylo cuenta de la manera más verosímil

plausibly

advplausibel; argue alsoeinleuchtend; lie, present one’s excusesgeschickt; tell a story, act a partauf überzeugende Art, überzeugend

plausibly

[ˈplɔːzəblɪ] advin modo convincente
References in classic literature ?
Tom got out of the presence as quick as he plausibly could, and after that he complained of toothache for a week, and tied up his jaws every night.
Hence some critics have been able plausibly to pretend to take the book as a satire on Socialism.
I then gave him some more; three times did I fill the bowl for him, and three times did he drain it without thought or heed; then, when I saw that the wine had got into his head, I said to him as plausibly as I could: 'Cyclops, you ask my name and I will tell it you; give me, therefore, the present you promised me; my name is Noman; this is what my father and mother and my friends have always called me.
It is in the case of space that quantity most plausibly appears to admit of a contrary.
Indeed each and all of these lines of conduct might have been very plausibly pursued.
Disposed, however, as he always is to think the best of everyone, her display of grief, and professions of regret, and general resolutions of prudence, were sufficient to soften his heart and make him really confide in her sincerity; but, as for myself, I am still unconvinced, and plausibly as her ladyship has now written, I cannot make up my mind till I better understand her real meaning in coming to us.
It was a stroke of positive genius on his part to see in the burglary scare which was convulsing the country side an opportunity of plausibly getting rid of the man whom he feared.
It needed, in particular, a constant repetition of a phrase to the effect that he shared the common fate, found it best of all, and wished for no other; and by repeating such phrases he acquired punctuality and habits of work, and could very plausibly demonstrate that to be a clerk in a solicitor's office was the best of all possible lives, and that other ambitions were vain.
Some people who had lost by him called him a vicious man; but he regarded horse-dealing as the finest of the arts, and might have argued plausibly that it had nothing to do with morality.
And when saying this Vasili Andreevich was honestly convinced that he was Nikita's benefactor, and he knew how to put it so plausibly that all those who depended on him for their money, beginning with Nikita, confirmed him in the conviction that he was their benefactor and did not overreach them.
I only suggested that because you said one could not plausibly connect snuff with clockwork or candles with bright stones.
Your father, too, was a man of learning as befitted his position; no man more plausibly conducted school; nor had he the manner or the speech of a common dominie; but (as ye will yourself remember) I took aye a pleasure to have him to the manse to meet the gentry; and those of my own house, Campbell of Kilrennet, Campbell of Dunswire, Campbell of Minch, and others, all well-kenned gentlemen, had pleasure in his society.