play with


Also found in: Idioms.
Related to play with: play with fire

play with

vb (intr, preposition)
1. to consider without giving deep thought to or coming to a conclusion concerning: we're playing with the idea of emigrating.
2. to behave carelessly with: to play with a girl's affections.
3. to fiddle or mess about with: he's just playing with his food.
Translations

w>play with

vi +prep obj to play with the idea of doing somethingmit dem Gedanken spielen, etw zu tun; we don’t have much time/money to play withwir haben zeitlich/finanziell nicht viel Spielraum; we don’t have that many alternatives to play withso viele Alternativen haben wir nicht zur Verfügung; to play with oneselfan sich (dat)herumfummeln
References in classic literature ?
It is also very necessary that children should have some employment which will amuse them; for which reason the rattle of Archytas seems well contrived, which they give children to play with, to prevent their breaking those things which are about the house; for at their age they cannot sit still: this therefore is well adapted to infants, as instruction ought to be their rattle as they grow up; hence it is evident that they should be so taught music as to be able to practise it.
With two of USC's top three cornerbacks (Terrell Thomas, Kevin Thomas, Cary Harris) having a combined 12 career starts, the Trojans seem to prefer to play with a bend-but-don't-break philosophy.
So in August 2005, she began taking golf lessons with PGA of America golf instructors at Evergreen Hills in their native Detroit, and she loves it: "It has been very special for me to be able to play with my son after years of taking him to the best courses and attending tournaments.
To learn to play with one hand steady and the other flee, the student should first play the steady part until it is "automatic," then play the free part with the nuance desired and finally, literally throw the two together.
Our term for this play with three options is "Triple".
It's consensual and trusting and people refer to it as "play" (as in "I want to play with you").
He challenges Richard Helgerson's notion in Forms of Nationhood: The Elizabethan Writing of England that "the contest between orality and literacy" (134) is particular to historical drama and a matter ultimately of authorial promotion, before tentatively associating the decline of the history play with Jacobean culture's awareness of historiography.
Try to imagine the play with the sex of the characters [Catherine and her father's student] reversed," Taylor says.
Yet what makes The Purple Flower particularly useful as a teaching tool and particularly powerful in performance is Bonner's deliberate solicitation of debate, nowhere more evident than in her decision to end the play with a question.
Linking play with discovery was developed through activities such as browsing materials, watching television, and speaking with colleagues.
The therapist does not actively play with the child, but rather participates as an observer, encourager, and reflector of feelings (Axline, 1948; Landreth, 1991).
Like a karate master before a match, a puppy invites play with a "play bow," by kneeling forward on its forepaws.