pleasurable

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pleas·ur·a·ble

 (plĕzh′ər-ə-bəl)
adj.
Agreeable; gratifying.

pleas′ur·a·bil′i·ty, pleas′ur·a·ble·ness n.
pleas′ur·a·bly adv.

pleasurable

(ˈplɛʒərəbəl)
adj
enjoyable, agreeable, or gratifying
ˈpleasurableness n
ˈpleasurably adv

pleas•ur•a•ble

(ˈplɛʒ ər ə bəl)

adj.
such as to give pleasure; enjoyable; agreeable; pleasant: a pleasurable experience.
[1570–80]
pleas′ur•a•ble•ness, n.
pleas′ur•a•bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.pleasurable - affording satisfaction or pleasure; "the company was enjoyable"; "found her praise gratifying"; "full of happiness and pleasurable excitement"; "good printing makes a book more pleasurable to read"
pleasant - affording pleasure; being in harmony with your taste or likings; "we had a pleasant evening together"; "a pleasant scene"; "pleasant sensations"

pleasurable

adjective enjoyable, pleasant, diverting, good, nice, welcome, fun, lovely, entertaining, delightful, gratifying, agreeable, congenial the most pleasurable experience of the evening

pleasurable

adjective
Translations
سارٌّ، مُمْتِع
příjemný
fornøjelig
ánægjulegur
zevk verici

pleasurable

[ˈpleʒərəbl] ADJagradable, grato

pleasurable

[ˈplɛʒərəbəl] adjagréable

pleasurable

adjangenehm; anticipationfreudig

pleasurable

[ˈplɛʒrəbl] adj(molto) piacevole or gradevole

pleasure

(ˈpleʒə) noun
something that gives one enjoyment; joy or delight. the pleasures of country life; I get a lot of pleasure from listening to music.
ˈpleasurable adjective
giving pleasure; agreeable. a pleasurable pastime.
ˈpleasurably adverb
ˈpleasure-boat / ˈpleasure-craft nouns
a boat used for pleasure.
take pleasure in
to get enjoyment from. He takes great pleasure in annoying me.
References in periodicals archive ?
Concerning the writing of some theorists, Christian wrote: "As a student of literature, I am appalled by the sheer ugliness of the language, its lack of clarity, its unnecessarily complicated sentence constructions, its lack of pleasurableness, its alienating quality.
The claim is this, "Kant's position rests on the claim that aesthetic judgments are universally 'valid' since they are based on the universal pleasurableness of the free harmony of the imagination and understanding.
William Dickens argued that subjective rankings of the pleasurableness or unpleasurableness of activities have probably changed over time, although this is impossible to measure.