plebians


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plebians

A Roman central citizen class with self-administrative rights.
References in classic literature ?
The Venetians, if their achievements are considered, will be seen to have acted safely and gloriously so long as they sent to war their own men, when with armed gentlemen and plebians they did valiantly.
The former, in which the people voted by centuries, was so arranged as to give a superiority to the patrician interest; in the latter, in which numbers prevailed, the plebian interest had an entire predominancy.
She was a large, sleek, gray-and-white cat, with an enormous dignity which was not at all impaired by any consciousness of her plebian origin.
To corporate power brokers, Farage, a former banker, is almost "one of us", a useful temporary distraction for the plebians.
Brutus and Cassius occupied this lower level as they gazed upon the new dictator, with plebians scattering about them or descending to the main stage.
This epic story shows the struggle between the lower class, plebians, and the upper class, patricians, through the generations of the Roman Republic.
And yet, of the three broad social categories only patricians were fully-fledged participants, the plebians were allowed to participate but nominally and the slaves were totally excluded from participation.
It was a considerably less famous Rod Stewart (yes, the Rod Stewart) who played the town's Plebians Jazz Club with the Soul Agents on June 5, 1965 when he was only 21.
In the West it was discovered in Greek poleis such as Athens where the heads of households enjoyed leisure from household affairs so they could gather together as citizens and discuss the requirements of their polis and convince one another to act together upon projects for its benefit; and in the Rome where numerous assemblies--of plebians, soldiers, and the patricians confronted one another in making law and policy for the city.
From Rome's founding by the star-crossed twins Romulus and Remus, to the tragedy of the hero-traitor Coriolanus, the capture of the city by the Gauls, the invasion of Hannibal, ruthless political struggles between the patricians and the plebians, and the end of Rome's republic with the triumph and subsequent assassination of Julius Caesar, Roma is epic in scope.
This is indicated most clearly by the cries of the Plebians after Brutus's speech: "Let him be Caesar" and "Caesar's better parts/Shall be crowned in Brutus" (III.