plenitude


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plen·i·tude

 (plĕn′ĭ-to͞od′, -tyo͞od′)
n.
1. An ample amount or quantity; an abundance: a region blessed with a plenitude of natural resources.
2. The condition of being full, ample, or complete.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin plēnitūdō, from plēnus, full; see pelə- in Indo-European roots.]

plen′i·tu′di·nous (-to͞od′n-əs, -tyo͞od′-) adj.

plenitude

(ˈplɛnɪˌtjuːd)
n
1. abundance; copiousness
2. the condition of being full or complete
[C15: via Old French from Latin plēnitūdō, from plēnus full]

plen•i•tude

(ˈplɛn ɪˌtud, -ˌtyud)

n.
1. fullness or adequacy; abundance: a plenitude of food.
2. the state of being full or complete.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin plēnitūdō. See plenum, -i-, -tude]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plenitude - a full supply; "there was plenty of food for everyone"
abundance, copiousness, teemingness - the property of a more than adequate quantity or supply; "an age of abundance"

plenitude

noun
1. completeness, fullness, amplitude, repletion The music brought him a feeling of plenitude and freedom.
2. abundance, wealth, excess, bounty, plenty, plethora, profusion, cornucopia, copiousness, plenteousness a book with a plenitude of pictures

plenitude

noun
Prosperity and a sufficiency of life's necessities:
Translations

plenitude

[ˈplenɪtjuːd] Nplenitud f

plenitude

n (liter)Fülle f
References in classic literature ?
In the plenitude of his passion he was an exacting lover.
Hats of the most ample brim and longest nap; coats with buttons that shone like mirrors, and pantaloons of the most ample plenitude, took place of the well-worn trapper's equipments; and the happy wearers might be seen strolling about in all directions, scattering their silver like sailors just from a cruise.
I felt assured, at first sight, that she was not a Belgian; her complexion, her countenance, her lineaments, her figure, were all distinct from theirs, and, evidently, the type of another race--of a race less gifted with fullness of flesh and plenitude of blood; less jocund, material, unthinking.
No signs of habitation were visible, but that the land might easily support human life was evidenced by the abundant bird and animal life of which the watchers on the Fuwalda's deck caught occasional glimpses, as well as by the shimmer of a little river which emptied into the harbor, insuring fresh water in plenitude.
It was thus that, five-and-forty years after, in this dark street of Paris, that festive day was finishing, blessed, in the plenitude of nature, by that august old man, celebrated by the alternate song of all the birds of Rocaillet.
Lecount, in the plenitude of her triumph, might have pitied her fallen enemy at last.
In fact, the minister, who, in the plenitude of his power, had been unable to unearth Napoleon's secret, might in despair at his own downfall interrogate Dantes and so lay bare the motives of Villefort's plot.
It was in this emergency that Mr Willet displayed something of that strength of mind and plenitude of mental resource, which rendered him the admiration of all his friends and neighbours.
The loves and sorrows that are great are destroyed by their own plenitude.
Your stomachs are round with the plenitude of eating.
It is a self-trust which slights the restraints of prudence, in the plenitude of its energy and power to repair the harms it may suffer.
In short, the family of Ishmael appeared now to be in the plenitude of an enjoyment, which depended on inactivity, but which was not entirely free from certain confused glimmerings of a perspective, in which their security stood in some little danger of a rude interruption from Teton treachery.