pleonasm


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ple·o·nasm

 (plē′ə-năz′əm)
n.
1.
a. The use of more words than are required to express an idea; redundancy.
b. An instance of pleonasm.
2. A superfluous word or phrase.

[Late Latin pleonasmus, from Greek pleonasmos, from pleonazein, to be excessive, from pleōn, more; see pelə- in Indo-European roots.]

ple′o·nas′tic (-năs′tĭk) adj.
ple′o·nas′ti·cal·ly adv.

pleonasm

(ˈpliːəˌnæzəm)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the use of more words than necessary or an instance of this, such as a tiny little child
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a word or phrase that is superfluous
[C16: from Latin pleonasmus, from Greek pleonasmos excess, from pleonazein to be redundant]
ˌpleoˈnastic, ˌpleoˈnastical adj
ˌpleoˈnastically adv

ple•o•nasm

(ˈpli əˌnæz əm)

n.
1. the use of more words than are necessary to express an idea; redundancy.
2. an instance of this, as free gift.
[1580–90; < Late Latin pleonasmus < Greek pleonasmós redundancy, surplus, derivative of pleonázein to be more than enough, derivative of pleíōn more]
ple`o•nas′tic, adj.
ple`o•nas′ti•cal•ly, adv.

pleonasm

1. the use of unnecessary words to express an idea; redundancy.
2. an instance of this, as true fact.
3. a redundant word or expression. — pleonastic, adj.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices
1. the use of unnecessary words to express an idea; redundancy.
2. an instance of this, as true fact.
3. a redundant word or expression. — pleonastic, adj.
See also: Language

pleonasm

A superfluous word or phrase, or the use of more words than necessary.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pleonasm - using more words than necessary; "a tiny little child"
verboseness, verbosity - an expressive style that uses excessive or empty words

pleonasm

noun
Words or the use of words in excess of those needed for clarity or precision:
Translations
pleonasmus
pleonazmusszinonimahalmozásszószaporítás

pleonasm

[ˈpliːənæzəm] Npleonasmo m

pleonasm

nPleonasmus m
References in periodicals archive ?
Of course, you knew there would be a word to describe the use of more words than are necessary to convey meaning: pleonasm.
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As a card-carrying grammar nerd, I welcomed the "linguistic rant" against pleonasm but must point out a few ironies in the piece ("Destroying 'totally destroy,'" Sept.
For me, GH should be a pleonasm, it should belong to all.
For comparison, pleonasm is less common for storm modes with a well-established, objective criterion.
Consequently, in the Austrian view, irrational behavior is impossible by definition; hence, rational behavior must be seen as a pleonasm.
have already heard: namely, that by treating the phrase "student workers" as a pleonasm hasn't one effectively factored the student out of the equation?
Correspondingly, other obvious dangers in epithetism--the risk of pleonasm and the cbeville in automatic collocations, a certain tendency toward prolixity and a concomitant loss of perceptual intensity--are removed.
The first target is the term "social justice," which Jasay thinks a pleonasm at best, a dangerous subversion of justice at worst.
Since no one desires the apparently good when one knows that this is not really good, it is something of a pleonasm to claim that appetite takes the apparently pleasurable as unqualifiedly good.
In a peculiar interlude, tyrannized by pleonasm, Albioni tries also to stammer out something about "a religion of listening"; there is also, however, a direct quotation from Dalgarno that doesn't seem unworthy of its commentator: "I am at once prey to synteresis and the confessional.