pleonasm


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ple·o·nasm

 (plē′ə-năz′əm)
n.
1.
a. The use of more words than are required to express an idea; redundancy.
b. An instance of pleonasm.
2. A superfluous word or phrase.

[Late Latin pleonasmus, from Greek pleonasmos, from pleonazein, to be excessive, from pleōn, more; see pelə- in Indo-European roots.]

ple′o·nas′tic (-năs′tĭk) adj.
ple′o·nas′ti·cal·ly adv.

pleonasm

(ˈpliːəˌnæzəm)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the use of more words than necessary or an instance of this, such as a tiny little child
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a word or phrase that is superfluous
[C16: from Latin pleonasmus, from Greek pleonasmos excess, from pleonazein to be redundant]
ˌpleoˈnastic, ˌpleoˈnastical adj
ˌpleoˈnastically adv

ple•o•nasm

(ˈpli əˌnæz əm)

n.
1. the use of more words than are necessary to express an idea; redundancy.
2. an instance of this, as free gift.
[1580–90; < Late Latin pleonasmus < Greek pleonasmós redundancy, surplus, derivative of pleonázein to be more than enough, derivative of pleíōn more]
ple`o•nas′tic, adj.
ple`o•nas′ti•cal•ly, adv.

pleonasm

1. the use of unnecessary words to express an idea; redundancy.
2. an instance of this, as true fact.
3. a redundant word or expression. — pleonastic, adj.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices
1. the use of unnecessary words to express an idea; redundancy.
2. an instance of this, as true fact.
3. a redundant word or expression. — pleonastic, adj.
See also: Language

pleonasm

A superfluous word or phrase, or the use of more words than necessary.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pleonasm - using more words than necessary; "a tiny little child"
verboseness, verbosity - an expressive style that uses excessive or empty words

pleonasm

noun
Words or the use of words in excess of those needed for clarity or precision:
Translations
pleonasmus
pleonazmusszinonimahalmozásszószaporítás

pleonasm

[ˈpliːənæzəm] Npleonasmo m

pleonasm

nPleonasmus m
References in periodicals archive ?
Correspondingly, other obvious dangers in epithetism--the risk of pleonasm and the cbeville in automatic collocations, a certain tendency toward prolixity and a concomitant loss of perceptual intensity--are removed.
The first target is the term "social justice," which Jasay thinks a pleonasm at best, a dangerous subversion of justice at worst.
have already heard: namely, that by treating the phrase "student workers" as a pleonasm hasn't one effectively factored the student out of the equation?
Since no one desires the apparently good when one knows that this is not really good, it is something of a pleonasm to claim that appetite takes the apparently pleasurable as unqualifiedly good.
In a peculiar interlude, tyrannized by pleonasm, Albioni tries also to stammer out something about "a religion of listening"; there is also, however, a direct quotation from Dalgarno that doesn't seem unworthy of its commentator: "I am at once prey to synteresis and the confessional.
In the first part of To the Wonder, given the opportunity to make the French-language art film one suspects has always been his ambition, and deprived of his dependence on fastidious period detail, Malick delivers postcards and pleonasm, reducing Paris to stark-treed parks, a visit to the Louvre, and strolls by the Seine, where Marina and beau attach a love padlock to a picturesque pont.
Wordsworth is, however, clear-eyed in his reading of the lines discussing science: "'Truth's and Science' ray,' for the ray of Truth and Science, is not only extremely harsh, but a 'ray shone' is, if not absolutely a pleonasm, a great awkwardness; a 'ray fell' or 'shot' may be said, and a sun, or a moon, or a candle shone, but not a ray.
Prolixity, grandiloquence, pleonasm, macrologia and logorrhoea.
The paradoxical trope of practical constraint as both limitation and liberty is nowhere clearer than in the book's digressions, which in their wandering trajectories exemplify Burton's use of paratactic strategies such as the pleonasm and the list.
However, this would be a pleonasm, since all higher functions are cerebral.