pleonastic


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ple·o·nasm

 (plē′ə-năz′əm)
n.
1.
a. The use of more words than are required to express an idea; redundancy.
b. An instance of pleonasm.
2. A superfluous word or phrase.

[Late Latin pleonasmus, from Greek pleonasmos, from pleonazein, to be excessive, from pleōn, more; see pelə- in Indo-European roots.]

ple′o·nas′tic (-năs′tĭk) adj.
ple′o·nas′ti·cal·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.pleonastic - repetition of same sense in different words; "`a true fact' and `a free gift' are pleonastic expressions"; "the phrase `a beginner who has just started' is tautological"; "at the risk of being redundant I return to my original proposition"- J.B.Conant
prolix - tediously prolonged or tending to speak or write at great length; "editing a prolix manuscript"; "a prolix lecturer telling you more than you want to know"

pleonastic

adjective
Using or containing an excessive number of words:
Translations
pleonasztikusszóhalmazószószaporító

pleonastic

[plɪəˈnæstɪk] ADJpleonástico

pleonastic

adjpleonastisch
References in periodicals archive ?
To the contrary, Robbins resorted to such pleonastic phraseology as a means of emphasizing the inscrutability of these data and their modes of change to the theorist.
In setting forth the theory of realization, which refers to "an event of fulfillment or confirmation in realizing the agent's intention or goal in carrying out an action", Talmy postulates four verbal patterns, namely, (i) intrinsic-fulfillment verbs co-occurring with a further event satellite (2), (ii) moot-fulfillment verbs co-occurring with a fulfillment satellite, (iii) implied-fulfillment verbs co-occurring with a confirmation satellite, and (iv) attained-fulfillment verbs co-occurring with a pleonastic satellite.
The other five finalists of this year's program include Sand by Alvin Easter (USA), The Breadwinner by Robert Heydon (Canada), Pleonastic by Samuel Kiehoon Lee (Korea), Tafahum by Omar Saleh (Jordan) and Jose by Michael Rousselet and Erik Sandoval (USA).
Meanwhile, wrong-footed by globalisation's pleonastic cavalry, culturalists wallow in moral confusion and intellectual exhaustion.
In Book 6, Deiphobus, appearing as a mangled ghost, has "populataque tempora raptis auribus" (a phrase breathy with short a-sounds), literally "ravaged temples and ears stolen away" Do you meld a doubled, pleonastic expression into something simple, raping Virgil's style to get a trouble-free twentieth-century-sounding one?
Freely punctuated by repetitions, revisions, ums, ahs, and tantalizing silences, Cruz's delivery frayed the novel's already pleonastic story lines to the point of incomprehensibility, mutating the text into the rambling sound track of a thought process or even an esoteric act of self-pleasuring.
In this book he aims to resuscitate the face-value theory with an account of propositions as pleonastic entities.
Nothing is less innocent, pleonastic and natural, nothing is more historical than this proposition, even if it seems too obvious" (Derrida, 2001:180.
He compares pleonastic "do" forms in the Elegy with Shakespeare's texts, finding a marked preference for such locutions in the poem.
Winkler does also recognize these difficulties while writing: "in some cases [of pronominal declination] a pleonastic PX forms a unit with the CX" (p.
Were we to attempt to mimic in modern life the self-reliance of Crusoe as sole provider of all goods and services, we would be charting a life where family, and social relations are an impediment in that for Crusoe at least human networks were pleonastic.