pleonastic


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ple·o·nasm

 (plē′ə-năz′əm)
n.
1.
a. The use of more words than are required to express an idea; redundancy.
b. An instance of pleonasm.
2. A superfluous word or phrase.

[Late Latin pleonasmus, from Greek pleonasmos, from pleonazein, to be excessive, from pleōn, more; see pelə- in Indo-European roots.]

ple′o·nas′tic (-năs′tĭk) adj.
ple′o·nas′ti·cal·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.pleonastic - repetition of same sense in different words; "`a true fact' and `a free gift' are pleonastic expressions"; "the phrase `a beginner who has just started' is tautological"; "at the risk of being redundant I return to my original proposition"- J.B.Conant
prolix - tediously prolonged or tending to speak or write at great length; "editing a prolix manuscript"; "a prolix lecturer telling you more than you want to know"

pleonastic

adjective
Using or containing an excessive number of words:
Translations
pleonasztikusszóhalmazószószaporító

pleonastic

[plɪəˈnæstɪk] ADJpleonástico

pleonastic

adjpleonastisch
References in periodicals archive ?
Out of the 30 occurrences, only one may be valued as neutral albeit pleonastic (popor de oameni [people of men]), all the other being associated with negative estimations related to:
Moving to example 7b, once the agent has hypothesized that it refers to the truck, it can penalize all senses of take whose subject must be either pleonastic (that is, nonreferential, as in It takes time to learn things well) or refer to a human.
While contradicting her previous stance, Lenor's pleonastic "true truth" displays itself as mere rhetorical facade here, a naive tautology that her own doubts about the pedagogical impact of the intellectuals on the people easily call into question.
More specifically, when that added element is another appositional marker, they talk of pleonastic markers.
Mencken and Duke Ellington, but I got the suicidal martinet General Emory Upton, the pleonastic novelist John Gardner, and accordion virtuosi.
In her recent book, she also gives tallies of miscellaneous features, such as pleonastic "do," disyllabic pronunciations of "-ion," grammatical inversions, and examples of "-ed" and "-eth" endings with syllabic value.
I also calculated the ratio of syllabic suffixes -ed and -eth, of pleonastic verbs do, of the disyllabic form of the suffix -ion, e.
The films' frontal framing, declamatory line readings, and privileging of the word as equal to image and music share odd kinship with the materialist cinema of Jean-Marie Straub and Daniele Huillet, whose Chronicle of Anna Magdalena Bach (1968) Oliveira greatly admired; their spiritual-amorous quandaries with Carl Theodor Dreyer's Gertrud (1964) and emphasis on religious miracles with his Ordet (1955); and their pleonastic narration and affectless acting with the films of Robert Bresson.
Stephen Schiffer's pleonastic account of fictional characters, antithetical to my view in certain respects, may help elucidate my position.
But the pleonastic emphasis on exclusivity--"thy commandment all alone"--will provide a baseline against which the futility of Hamlet's project of "exclusion" will unfold.
10) Nor is this to embrace anew a pleonastic interpretation of body and soul in the reading of pre-Hellenistic texts.