pleonexia


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pleonexia

(ˌpliːəˈnɛksɪə)
n
excessive greed
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It should be easy to conclude, as Aristotle did, that pleonexia (greed) is a negative conduct.
Specifically, the psychic root of pleonexia lies in the way thumos tends to overreact to threats to the evanescent, vulnerable goods on which we depend for life and flourishing.
So esta ultima pode combinar a imparcialidade exigida pela igualdade politica com a cobica ou o sentimento de inveja, postos em movimento pela pleonexia pessoais (10).
However, it is precisely here where Eve's narcissistic thespian pleonexia (over-reaching) leads her to her final fate.
The poverty of Cavafy's Ithaca is contrasted to the rich adventure it made possible, and corresponds to Camus' attack on what Plato characterized as pleonexia (insatiable appetite and greed) in the Republic.
La vida, entonces, con su armadura entra en lucha para que se reconozca lo comunitario, hoy interrumpido por la envidia, el odio y las discriminaciones clasistas, sexistas, "raciales" y de los centros hacia las periferias: el dominio, cuya base es la pleonexia, querer todo el poder economico, el politico y la pleitesia cultural para uno con exclusion de los demas.
Apparently, Voegelin assumes that merely to have represented utopian ideas in a fiction is a source of negative social consequences: "More has the dubious historical merit of having expressed for the first time the full pleonexia of secular reason, justice, and morality.
It is this sharing with God and each other that would generate enjoyment of the fruits of God's garden and that distinguishes it from "hedonism, covetousness, or the greed of pleonexia.
Meikle is right in saying that as transactions whose end is money for the sake of money leads though it may not be exactly greedy but often leads to this, pleonexia, since there is no natural limit for these transactions.
The human penchant for spiralling desire has been much maligned by philosophers--the ancient Greeks called it pleonexia, a form of psychic pathology--but clearly it has been adaptive in evolutionary terms.
In hindsight, we know this pleonexia was endemic to the strategy of Gonzalez-Torres and his gallerist, Andrea Rosen, taking full economic advantage of the certifiable ambiguities in his work.
The "desire to acquire" may be compared to the Hellenic idea of greed or pleonexia.