plica

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pli·ca

 (plī′kə)
n. pl. pli·cae (plī′sē, -kē)
A fold or ridge, as of skin, membrane, or shell.

[Medieval Latin, fold, from Latin plicāre, to fold; see plek- in Indo-European roots.]

pli′cal adj.

plica

(ˈplaɪkə)
n, pl plicae (ˈplaɪsiː)
1. (Anatomy) anatomy Also called: fold a folding over of parts, such as a fold of skin, muscle, peritoneum, etc
2. (Pathology) pathol a condition of the hair characterized by matting, filth, and the presence of parasites
[C17: from Medieval Latin: a fold, from Latin plicāre to fold; see ply2]
ˈplical adj

pli•ca

(ˈplaɪ kə)

n., pl. pli•cae (ˈplaɪ si, -ki)
a fold, as of a mucous membrane.
[1675–85; < Medieval Latin: a fold, n. derivative of Latin plicāre to fold]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plica - a folded part (as in skin or muscle)
anatomical structure, bodily structure, body structure, complex body part, structure - a particular complex anatomical part of a living thing; "he has good bone structure"
epicanthic fold, epicanthus - a vertical fold of skin over the nasal canthus; normal for Mongolian peoples; sometimes occurs in Down's syndrome
plica vocalis, vocal band, vocal cord, vocal fold - either of two pairs of folds of mucous membrane projecting into the larynx
ruga - (anatomy) a fold or wrinkle or crease; "rugae of the stomach"
tentorium - (anatomy) a fold of dura mater that covers the cerebellum and supports the occipital lobes of the cerebrum

plica

noun
A line or an arrangement made by the doubling of one part over another:
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Salon de Recepcion de Plicas, Depto Adquisiciones y Mantenimiento.
183-212-an enlargement of the score provided in the monograph published separately as La Messe de Nostre Dame, Oxford Choral Music [Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1990] with a one-page introduction summarizing the book's main points on accidentals, plicas, voices, tuning, pronunciation, and tempo in lieu of a critical apparatus).
Variants in the alignment of text and music, ligatures, page layout, pitches and rhythms, plicas, and sharps and flats are listed in separate tables, with detailed commentary on alternative texting and musica ficta.