plotz


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plotz

(plɒts)
vb
to set down abruptlyto faint, collapse, or explode

plotz

(plɒts)

v.i. Slang.
to collapse or faint, as from surprise, excitement, or exhaustion.
[1940–45, Amer.; < Yiddish platsn literally, to crack, split, burst < Middle High German blatzen, platzen]
References in periodicals archive ?
Thee awl-whys sol praise, seize, here's, nose weave finely one uh whirled-premier, grayed-eh, tighten pries baste awn reel fax inn bettor, meteor, Whittier, finally-maid plotz witch plum purist soles.
When May's daughter-inlaw visits, she determines to find May "a husband or plotz.
Chris Plotz, product manager, says the technology was developed after the company looked at the market and found that there was a big problem with people getting fined or written up for not properly sanitizing areas in the food service industry.
In a very special episode of the TribCast, Reeve, Emily and Ross join David Plotz, Emily Bazelon and John Dickerson of the Slate Political Gabfest to talk about Common Core, the gubernatorial race and the presidential hopes of notable Texans.
Decreased urinary excretion rates: Kahler W, Kuklinski B, Ruhlmann C, Plotz C.
the editor of Slate, David Plotz, as reporting that "Slate is not a
Seibert disagrees, but he vehemently maintains that solving the problem of the violence that revolted Plotz by ignoring, "spiritualizing," or uncritically accepting it is no solution at all.
Michalski and her husband Stanley of Lynn; a sister, Florence Benson of Framingham; three grandchildren, John Michalski and his wife Karen of Lynnfield, Carrie Plotz and her partner Ray Darby of Gainesville, FL and Melissa LaPierre and her husband Urgel of Thompson, CT; and six great grandchildren.
20) As Judith Plotz has pointed out in an unpublished conference paper, although "Waring" is cited "at random" by Beetle in "Slaves of the Lamp, I," where it is accompanied by excerpts from "Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister" and "Caliban upon Setebos," the poem acquires a more distinct meaning in "Slaves of the Lamp, II," when Beetle and M'Turk exalt the absent Stalky as an "invulnerable" Guru whose regal manner as an Anglo-Indian officer has made him god-like.
The interest in "thing theory" has flourished in nineteenth century studies, but it is also important in scholarship of modernism in the work of several scholars; see John Frow, "A pebble, a Camera, a Man who Turns into a Telegraph Pole" (2001), and John Plotz, "Can the Sofa Speak?
Everett got a solo home run from Patrick Kivlehan in the second inning and led the rest of the way until the ninth inning, when the Ems rallied for two runs off Brandon Plotz.