ploughing


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plow

also plough  (plou)
n.
1. A farm implement consisting of a strong blade at the end of a beam, usually hitched to a draft team or motor vehicle and used for breaking up soil and cutting furrows in preparation for sowing.
2. An implement or machine designed to move earth, snow, or other material by means of a strong blade.
3. Plow See Big Dipper.
v. plowed, plow·ing, plows also ploughed or plough·ing or ploughs
v.tr.
1.
a. To break and turn over (earth) with a plow.
b. To form (a furrow, for example) with a plow.
c. To form furrows in with a plow: plow a field.
d. To form wrinkles or creases in: His forehead was plowed with lines of stress.
2.
a. To move or clear (snow, for example) by means of a plow.
b. To clear (an area) of snow or other material by means of a plow.
3. To make or form with driving force: I plowed my way through the crowd.
4. To progress through (water): plow the high seas.
5. Vulgar Slang To have intercourse with (another). Used of a man.
v.intr.
1. To break and turn up earth with a plow.
2. To move or clear material such as snow with a plow.
3. To admit of plowing: Rocky earth plows poorly.
4. To move or progress with driving force: The ball carrier plowed through the defensive line.
5. To proceed laboriously; plod: plowed through the backlog of work.
Phrasal Verbs:
plow back
To reinvest (earnings or profits) in one's business.
plow in
To block or isolate by plowing snow across ways of egress.
plow into Informal
1. To strike with force: The van plowed into the hydrant.
2. To begin to eat (food) with eagerness.
plow under
1. To turn or force (crops or manure, for example) into the soil with a plow.
2. To overwhelm, as with burdens: was plowed under with work.

[Middle English plough, plouw, from Old English plōh, plōg, plow, plowland.]

plow′a·ble adj.
plow′er n.

ploughing

(ˈplaʊɪŋ) or

plowing

n
(Agriculture) the act of ploughing a field
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ploughing - tilling the land with a plowploughing - tilling the land with a plow; "he hired someone to do the plowing for him"
tilling - cultivation of the land in order to raise crops
Translations

ploughing

plowing (US) [ˈplaʊɪŋ] Narada f
ploughing back of profitsreinversión f de ganancias

ploughing

, (US) plowing
nPflügen nt; the ploughing back of profits into the companydie Reinvestierung von Gewinnen in die Firma

ploughing

[ˈplaʊɪŋ] plowing (Am) naratura
References in classic literature ?
She greeted me gaily, and began at once to tell me how much ploughing she had done that day.
The Nantucketer, he alone resides and riots on the sea; he alone, in Bible language, goes down to it in ships; to and fro ploughing it as his own special plantation.
To picture the great potato-planting machine, drawn by four horses, or an electric motor, ploughing the furrow, cutting and dropping and covering the potatoes, and planting a score of acres a day
said Huck, ploughing among the tar- nished coins with his hand.
John's whole heart was set on becoming a country doctor, with Rebecca to keep house for him, and the vision seemed now so true, so near, that he could almost imagine his horse ploughing through snowdrifts on errands of mercy, or, less dramatic but none the less attractive, could see a physician's neat turncut trundling along the shady country roads, a medicine case between his, Dr.
Does he, while ploughing, break a plough,--or, while hoeing, break a hoe?
In another apartment I was highly pleased with a projector who had found a device of ploughing the ground with hogs, to save the charges of ploughs, cattle, and labour.
They saw Little Klaus ploughing with the five horses; but he was so happy that he kept on cracking his whip, and calling out 'Gee-up, my five horses
Ploughing and digging, vinedressing and pruning, are more in my way than defending provinces or kingdoms.
Round and round they fought, digging their heels into the ground to keep from slipping, so that you would have vowed there had been a yoke of oxen ploughing a potato-patch.
Before eight days were over the Abraham Lincoln would be ploughing the waters of the Pacific.
There are meadows that in some places come right down to the sea shore, well watered and full of luscious grass; grapes would do there excellently; there is level land for ploughing, and it would always yield heavily at harvest time, for the soil is deep.