plowed


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plow

also plough  (plou)
n.
1. A farm implement consisting of a strong blade at the end of a beam, usually hitched to a draft team or motor vehicle and used for breaking up soil and cutting furrows in preparation for sowing.
2. An implement or machine designed to move earth, snow, or other material by means of a strong blade.
3. Plow See Big Dipper.
v. plowed, plow·ing, plows also ploughed or plough·ing or ploughs
v.tr.
1.
a. To break and turn over (earth) with a plow.
b. To form (a furrow, for example) with a plow.
c. To form furrows in with a plow: plow a field.
d. To form wrinkles or creases in: His forehead was plowed with lines of stress.
2.
a. To move or clear (snow, for example) by means of a plow.
b. To clear (an area) of snow or other material by means of a plow.
3. To make or form with driving force: I plowed my way through the crowd.
4. To progress through (water): plow the high seas.
5. Vulgar Slang To have intercourse with (another). Used of a man.
v.intr.
1. To break and turn up earth with a plow.
2. To move or clear material such as snow with a plow.
3. To admit of plowing: Rocky earth plows poorly.
4. To move or progress with driving force: The ball carrier plowed through the defensive line.
5. To proceed laboriously; plod: plowed through the backlog of work.
Phrasal Verbs:
plow back
To reinvest (earnings or profits) in one's business.
plow in
To block or isolate by plowing snow across ways of egress.
plow into Informal
1. To strike with force: The van plowed into the hydrant.
2. To begin to eat (food) with eagerness.
plow under
1. To turn or force (crops or manure, for example) into the soil with a plow.
2. To overwhelm, as with burdens: was plowed under with work.

[Middle English plough, plouw, from Old English plōh, plōg, plow, plowland.]

plow′a·ble adj.
plow′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.plowed - (of farmland) broken and turned over with a plow; "plowed fields"
unploughed, unplowed, unbroken - (of farmland) not plowed; "unplowed fields"; "unbroken land"
References in classic literature ?
This shot that you see," added the scout, kicking the harmless iron with his foot, "has plowed the 'arth in its road from the fort, and we shall hunt for the furrow it has made, when all other signs may fail.
Over the hedge on one side we looked into a plowed field, and on the other we looked over a gate at our master's house, which stood by the roadside; at the top of the meadow was a grove of fir trees, and at the bottom a running brook overhung by a steep bank.
Practical jokes worthy of the English wits of the first quarter of the far-off nineteenth century were sprung here and there and yonder along the line, and compelled the delightedest applause; and sometimes when a bright remark was made at one end of the procession and started on its travels toward the other, you could note its progress all the way by the sparkling spray of laughter it threw off from its bows as it plowed along; and also by the blushes of the mules in its wake.
Here lies Wragge, embalmed in the tardy recognition of his species: he plowed, sowed, and reaped his fellow-creatures; and enlightened posterity congratulates him on the uniform excellence of his crops.
I hunt among the plowed fields tonight," and he plunged downward through the bushes, to the stream at the bottom of the valley.
And setting the example he plowed his oar into the sea; two strokes took the bark on twenty fathoms further.
The husbandmen plowed and planted as usual; but there lay the rich black furrows, all as barren as a desert of sand.