plumage


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to plumage: eclipse plumage

plum·age

 (plo͞o′mĭj)
n.
1. The covering of feathers on a bird.
2. Feathers used ornamentally.
3. Elaborate dress; finery.

[Middle English, from Old French, from plume, plume, from Latin plūma.]

plum′aged adj.

plumage

(ˈpluːmɪdʒ)
n
(Zoology) the layer of feathers covering the body of a bird
[C15: from Old French, from plume feather, from Latin plūma down]

plum•age

(ˈplu mɪdʒ)

n.
the entire feathery covering of a bird.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Middle French. See plume, -age]
plum′aged, adj.

plum·age

(plo͞o′mĭj)
The covering of feathers on a bird.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plumage - the light horny waterproof structure forming the external covering of birdsplumage - the light horny waterproof structure forming the external covering of birds
bird - warm-blooded egg-laying vertebrates characterized by feathers and forelimbs modified as wings
down, down feather - soft fine feathers
aftershaft - a supplementary feather (usually small) on the underside of the base of the shaft of some feathers in some birds
contour feather - feathers covering the body of an adult bird and determining its shape
bastard wing, spurious wing, alula - tuft of small stiff feathers on the first digit of a bird's wing
marabou - the downy feathers of marabou storks are used for trimming garments
web, vane - the flattened weblike part of a feather consisting of a series of barbs on either side of the shaft
hackle - long slender feather on the necks of e.g. turkeys and pheasants
quill, calamus, shaft - the hollow spine of a feather
flight feather, quill feather, pinion, quill - any of the larger wing or tail feathers of a bird
scapular - a feather covering the shoulder of a bird
body covering - any covering for the body or a body part
ceratin, keratin - a fibrous scleroprotein that occurs in the outer layer of the skin and in horny tissues such as hair, feathers, nails, and hooves
animal material - material derived from animals
melanin - insoluble pigments that account for the color of e.g. skin and scales and feathers

plumage

noun feathers, down, plumes razorbills with their handsome black and white plumage
Translations
ريش الطُّيور
opeřenípeří
fjerdragt
höyhenethöyhenpeitehöyhenpuku
tolltollazat
fjaîrir, fjaîraskraut
羽毛
apspalvojums
operenie

plumage

[ˈpluːmɪdʒ] Nplumaje m

plumage

[ˈpluːmɪdʒ] nplumage m

plumage

nGefieder nt, → Federkleid nt (liter)

plumage

[ˈpluːmɪdʒ] npiume fpl, piumaggio

plumage

(ˈpluːmidʒ) noun
the feathers of a bird or birds. The peacock has (a) brilliant plumage.
References in classic literature ?
The other birds, recognising their own borrowed plumage, indignantly protested, and began to strip him.
The plan was adopted, the necessary treaty made, with legislation to carry out its provisions; the Madagascarene Philosopher took his seat in the Temple of Immortality, and Peace spread her white wings over the two nations, to the unspeakable defiling of her plumage.
The rock-thrush of Guiana, birds of Paradise, and some others, congregate; and successive males display their gorgeous plumage and perform strange antics before the females, which standing by as spectators, at last choose the most attractive partner.
But the child, unaccustomed to the touch or familiarity of any but her mother, escaped through the open window, and stood on the upper step, looking like a wild tropical bird of rich plumage, ready to take flight into the upper air.
As yet the knights held their long lances upright, their bright points glancing to the sun, and the streamers with which they were decorated fluttering over the plumage of the helmets.
One day, when he had been left alone for a few minutes, a bird with brilliant plumage came and fluttered round the window, and finally rested on the sill.
Other poets have warbled the praises of the soft eye of the antelope, and the lovely plumage of the bird that never alights; less celestial, I celebrate a tail.
All at once there began the most horrid, unearthly screaming, which at first startled me badly, though I had soon remembered the voice of Captain Flint and even thought I could make out the bird by her bright plumage as she sat perched upon her master's wrist.
Scarce had the rubicund Apollo spread o'er the face of the broad spacious earth the golden threads of his bright hair, scarce had the little birds of painted plumage attuned their notes to hail with dulcet and mellifluous harmony the coming of the rosy Dawn, that, deserting the soft couch of her jealous spouse, was appearing to mortals at the gates and balconies of the Manchegan horizon, when the renowned knight Don Quixote of La Mancha, quitting the lazy down, mounted his celebrated steed Rocinante and began to traverse the ancient and famous Campo de Montiel;'" which in fact he was actually traversing.
For an instant they both remained motionless, and then the yellow hen shook her wings to settle the feathers and walked toward the door with a strut of proud defiance and a cluck of victory, while the speckled rooster limped away to the group of other chickens, trailing his crumpled plumage in the dust as he went.
At times, it seemed as if for every one of the hundred blossoms there was one of these tiniest fowls of the air,--a thumb's bigness of burnished plumage, hovering and vibrating about the bean-poles.
The two owls, the swallow, all three species of mocking-thrush, the dove in its separate colours though not in its whole plumage, the Totanus, and the gull, are likewise duskier coloured than their analogous species; and in the case of the mocking- thrush and Totanus, than any other species of the two genera.