plumage


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Related to plumage: eclipse plumage

plum·age

 (plo͞o′mĭj)
n.
1. The covering of feathers on a bird.
2. Feathers used ornamentally.
3. Elaborate dress; finery.

[Middle English, from Old French, from plume, plume, from Latin plūma.]

plum′aged adj.

plumage

(ˈpluːmɪdʒ)
n
(Zoology) the layer of feathers covering the body of a bird
[C15: from Old French, from plume feather, from Latin plūma down]

plum•age

(ˈplu mɪdʒ)

n.
the entire feathery covering of a bird.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Middle French. See plume, -age]
plum′aged, adj.

plum·age

(plo͞o′mĭj)
The covering of feathers on a bird.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plumage - the light horny waterproof structure forming the external covering of birdsplumage - the light horny waterproof structure forming the external covering of birds
bird - warm-blooded egg-laying vertebrates characterized by feathers and forelimbs modified as wings
down, down feather - soft fine feathers
aftershaft - a supplementary feather (usually small) on the underside of the base of the shaft of some feathers in some birds
contour feather - feathers covering the body of an adult bird and determining its shape
bastard wing, spurious wing, alula - tuft of small stiff feathers on the first digit of a bird's wing
marabou - the downy feathers of marabou storks are used for trimming garments
web, vane - the flattened weblike part of a feather consisting of a series of barbs on either side of the shaft
hackle - long slender feather on the necks of e.g. turkeys and pheasants
quill, calamus, shaft - the hollow spine of a feather
flight feather, quill feather, pinion, quill - any of the larger wing or tail feathers of a bird
scapular - a feather covering the shoulder of a bird
body covering - any covering for the body or a body part
ceratin, keratin - a fibrous scleroprotein that occurs in the outer layer of the skin and in horny tissues such as hair, feathers, nails, and hooves
animal material - material derived from animals
melanin - insoluble pigments that account for the color of e.g. skin and scales and feathers

plumage

noun feathers, down, plumes razorbills with their handsome black and white plumage
Translations
ريش الطُّيور
opeřenípeří
fjerdragt
höyhenethöyhenpeitehöyhenpuku
tolltollazat
fjaîrir, fjaîraskraut
羽毛
apspalvojums
operenie

plumage

[ˈpluːmɪdʒ] Nplumaje m

plumage

[ˈpluːmɪdʒ] nplumage m

plumage

nGefieder nt, → Federkleid nt (liter)

plumage

[ˈpluːmɪdʒ] npiume fpl, piumaggio

plumage

(ˈpluːmidʒ) noun
the feathers of a bird or birds. The peacock has (a) brilliant plumage.
References in classic literature ?
The tresses of this lady were shining and black, like the plumage of the raven.
At times, it seemed as if for every one of the hundred blossoms there was one of these tiniest fowls of the air,--a thumb's bigness of burnished plumage, hovering and vibrating about the bean-poles.
But the child, unaccustomed to the touch or familiarity of any but her mother, escaped through the open window, and stood on the upper step, looking like a wild tropical bird of rich plumage, ready to take flight into the upper air.
Other poets have warbled the praises of the soft eye of the antelope, and the lovely plumage of the bird that never alights; less celestial, I celebrate a tail.
While she was thinking what to say, Marie gradually wiped away her tears, and smoothed her plumage in a general sort of way, as a dove might be supposed to make toilet after a shower, and began a housewifely chat with Miss Ophelia, concerning cupboards, closets, linen-presses, store-rooms, and other matters, of which the latter was, by common understanding, to assume the direction, --giving her so many cautious directions and charges, that a head less systematic and business-like than Miss Ophelia's would have been utterly dizzied and confounded.
Happiness, excitement, the color of the green dress, and the touch of lovely pink in the coral necklace had transformed the little brown wren for the time into a bird of plumage, and Adam Ladd watched her with evident satisfaction.
I could not eat the tart; and the plumage of the bird, the tints of the flowers, seemed strangely faded: I put both plate and tart away.
Her hair was of that purely light-brown hue, unmixed with flaxen, or yellow, or red -- which is oftener seen on the plumage of a bird than on the head of a human being.
He was very cleanly dressed, in a blue coat, striped waistcoat, and nankeen trousers; and his fine frilled shirt and cambric neckcloth looked unusually soft and white, reminding my strolling fancy (I call to mind) of the plumage on the breast of a swan.
Meantime, the enclosed space at the northern extremity of the lists, large as it was, was now completely crowded with knights desirous to prove their skill against the challengers, and, when viewed from the galleries, presented the appearance of a sea of waving plumage, intermixed with glistening helmets, and tall lances, to the extremities of which were, in many cases, attached small pennons of about a span's breadth, which, fluttering in the air as the breeze caught them, joined with the restless motion of the feathers to add liveliness to the scene.
All at once there began the most horrid, unearthly screaming, which at first startled me badly, though I had soon remembered the voice of Captain Flint and even thought I could make out the bird by her bright plumage as she sat perched upon her master's wrist.
One day, when he had been left alone for a few minutes, a bird with brilliant plumage came and fluttered round the window, and finally rested on the sill.