plumage

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Related to plumages: eclipse plumage

plum·age

 (plo͞o′mĭj)
n.
1. The covering of feathers on a bird.
2. Feathers used ornamentally.
3. Elaborate dress; finery.

[Middle English, from Old French, from plume, plume, from Latin plūma.]

plum′aged adj.

plumage

(ˈpluːmɪdʒ)
n
(Zoology) the layer of feathers covering the body of a bird
[C15: from Old French, from plume feather, from Latin plūma down]

plum•age

(ˈplu mɪdʒ)

n.
the entire feathery covering of a bird.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Middle French. See plume, -age]
plum′aged, adj.

plum·age

(plo͞o′mĭj)
The covering of feathers on a bird.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plumage - the light horny waterproof structure forming the external covering of birdsplumage - the light horny waterproof structure forming the external covering of birds
bird - warm-blooded egg-laying vertebrates characterized by feathers and forelimbs modified as wings
down, down feather - soft fine feathers
aftershaft - a supplementary feather (usually small) on the underside of the base of the shaft of some feathers in some birds
contour feather - feathers covering the body of an adult bird and determining its shape
bastard wing, spurious wing, alula - tuft of small stiff feathers on the first digit of a bird's wing
marabou - the downy feathers of marabou storks are used for trimming garments
web, vane - the flattened weblike part of a feather consisting of a series of barbs on either side of the shaft
hackle - long slender feather on the necks of e.g. turkeys and pheasants
quill, calamus, shaft - the hollow spine of a feather
flight feather, quill feather, pinion, quill - any of the larger wing or tail feathers of a bird
scapular - a feather covering the shoulder of a bird
body covering - any covering for the body or a body part
ceratin, keratin - a fibrous scleroprotein that occurs in the outer layer of the skin and in horny tissues such as hair, feathers, nails, and hooves
animal material - material derived from animals
melanin - insoluble pigments that account for the color of e.g. skin and scales and feathers

plumage

noun feathers, down, plumes razorbills with their handsome black and white plumage
Translations
ريش الطُّيور
opeřenípeří
fjerdragt
höyhenethöyhenpeitehöyhenpuku
tolltollazat
fjaîrir, fjaîraskraut
羽毛
apspalvojums
operenie

plumage

[ˈpluːmɪdʒ] Nplumaje m

plumage

[ˈpluːmɪdʒ] nplumage m

plumage

nGefieder nt, → Federkleid nt (liter)

plumage

[ˈpluːmɪdʒ] npiume fpl, piumaggio

plumage

(ˈpluːmidʒ) noun
the feathers of a bird or birds. The peacock has (a) brilliant plumage.
References in periodicals archive ?
Juvenile feathers in Thamnophilidae are distinct from subsequent plumages by having loosely textured feathers with lower barb densities than in subsequent plumages, having distinct coloration, and having distinct shapes with rectrices being more pointed and longer, greater coverts being shorter, and remiges being shorter (Dwight 1900, Zimmer and Isler 2003).
For instance, the bright-red paint used to depict flowers and birds' plumages was a common pigment from that era called cinnabar.
As long as you are familiar with the common species in all their various plumages the rare ones should stand out easy enough.
Always tense and alert, his figures sport exotic plumages that advertise sexual availability.
Carotenoids produce most of the bright red, orange, and yellow colors in bird plumages (Brush 1981, Stradi 1998, McGraw 2006).
The juvenile plumages of many neotropical bird species are relatively well known.
Conventional North American molt terminology for birds was developed by Humphrey and Parkes (1959) to facilitate identification of homologies among molts and plumages across species through use of the neutral terms 'basic', 'alternate', and 'supplemental' rather than terms that refer to breeding status, plumage, or season of the year.
Both sexes are illustrated in the case of sexually dichromatic species whereas adult and juvenile or immature plumages are shown for those species with plumage that differs with age.
These are Plumages and Molts, and Shorebird Behavior.
Separation of birds in juvenal, formative, and definitive plumages was possible for all nine landbird species captured on Saipan, based upon plumage patterns, molt limits, feather shape and condition, and extent of skull pneumatization; some individuals of the two dove species can be identified in third-basic or later plumages.
The link between diet and plumage coloration should be particularly strong for species that have carotenoid-based plumages, which are highly dependent on carotenoid pigments obtained from food sources (Moller et al.
Gender similar in all plumages, although AHY/ASYs with bright purplish napes are invariably male and wing chord enables identification of most individuals: F = 128-135 mm, M = 134-140 mm.