plumule


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plu·mule

 (plo͞om′yo͞ol)
n.
1. A down feather.
2. The young shoot of a plant embryo above the cotyledons, consisting of the epicotyl and often of immature leaves.

[Latin plūmula, diminutive of plūma, feather.]

plu′mu·lose′ (plo͞om′yə-lōs′) adj.

plumule

(ˈpluːmjuːl)
n
1. (Botany) the embryonic shoot of seed-bearing plants
2. (Zoology) a down feather of young birds that persists in some adults
[C18: from Late Latin plūmula a little feather]

plu•mule

(ˈplum yul)

n.
1. the bud of the ascending axis of a plant while still in the embryo.
2. a down feather.
[1720–30; < New Latin, Latin plūmula. See plume, -ule]
plu′mu•lar (-yə lər) adj.

plu·mule

(plo͞om′yo͞ol)
The developing bud of a plant embryo, situated just below the cotyledons and often containing immature leaves. See more at germination.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plumule - down feather of young birdsplumule - down feather of young birds; persists in some adult birds
down, down feather - soft fine feathers
References in classic literature ?
The same fact holds good with flowering plants, of which the two main divisions have been founded on characters derived from the embryo,--on the number and position of the embryonic leaves or cotyledons, and on the mode of development of the plumule and radicle.
Bakhtyary and Hamedy [9] showed that in studying the effects of salinity stress on kidney beans, increasing salinity resulted to signifisant decreasing effect on rate and percentage of germination and also decreased the vegetative traits such as; radicle and plumule length, fresh weight of radicle and plumule, and plumule dry weight.
A tiny amount of siloxane is then deposited onto each plumule of down, adhering to its changed molecular structure in a virtually permanent way.
7) shows that the plumule is separated from the base of the radicle only by a plate of vascular tissue, called the cotyledonary,, plate by Rao (1971).
Once the yam seed coat ruptures and the radicle (root) and plumule (shoot) emerge, it cannot return to seed dormancy.
The effect of leachates on seed germination and radicle and plumule growth was tested by placing 100 seeds (five replications of 20 seeds each) of each test crop in petri dishes (9 cm diameter) containing three layers of Whatman No.
This exercise is introduced with a description of seedling morphology, including root hairs, cotyledons, hypocotyl, epicotyl and plumule.
From the position of the impression of the hypocotyl and plumule on the inner surface of the cotyledon, the notching of the cotyledon margin where the radicle was present before carbonization, and from the reniform shape of the cotyledon (FIGURE 2), one may infer that the specimens represent species of the subfamily Faboideae (Fabaceae), in which typically the embryonic axis is curved and the hilum marginal according to seed length (Delorit & Gunn 1986).
Similarly, Bhatt & Chauhan (2000) found an allelopathic influence of Quercus species on Triticum aestivum, Brassica campestris, and Lens culinaria, whose germination and plumule and radicle length were suppressed by leaf and bark extracts of all these trees.
Failure of a probed insect to move indicated death, while grains that had lost the plumule were considered totally damaged.
She provided information on morphology and vascular tissues of the cotyledon, plumule, and roots, and described briefly the