plumule

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plu·mule

 (plo͞om′yo͞ol)
n.
1. A down feather.
2. The young shoot of a plant embryo above the cotyledons, consisting of the epicotyl and often of immature leaves.

[Latin plūmula, diminutive of plūma, feather.]

plu′mu·lose′ (plo͞om′yə-lōs′) adj.

plumule

(ˈpluːmjuːl)
n
1. (Botany) the embryonic shoot of seed-bearing plants
2. (Zoology) a down feather of young birds that persists in some adults
[C18: from Late Latin plūmula a little feather]

plu•mule

(ˈplum yul)

n.
1. the bud of the ascending axis of a plant while still in the embryo.
2. a down feather.
[1720–30; < New Latin, Latin plūmula. See plume, -ule]
plu′mu•lar (-yə lər) adj.

plu·mule

(plo͞om′yo͞ol)
The developing bud of a plant embryo, situated just below the cotyledons and often containing immature leaves. See more at germination.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plumule - down feather of young birdsplumule - down feather of young birds; persists in some adult birds
down, down feather - soft fine feathers
References in classic literature ?
The same fact holds good with flowering plants, of which the two main divisions have been founded on characters derived from the embryo,--on the number and position of the embryonic leaves or cotyledons, and on the mode of development of the plumule and radicle.
During the induction phase of the plumules elongated get more out of environmental components and inhibit the growth of callus, these inhibitors are removed during the first transfer to the callus resume growth with good activity.
The number of germinated seeds was counted daily for up to 7 days because after this radicles and plumules in petri dishes normally start shrivelling at their tips.