plunder


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plun·der

 (plŭn′dər)
v. plun·dered, plun·der·ing, plun·ders
v.tr.
1. To rob of goods by force, especially in time of war; pillage: plunder a village.
2. To seize wrongfully or by force; steal: plundered the supplies.
v.intr.
To take booty; rob.
n.
1. The act or practice of plundering.
2. Property stolen by fraud or force; booty.

[German plündern, from Middle High German plundern, from Middle Low German plunder, household goods.]

plun′der·a·ble adj.
plun′der·er n.
plun′der·ous adj.

plunder

(ˈplʌndə)
vb
1. to steal (valuables, goods, sacred items, etc) from (a town, church, etc) by force, esp in time of war; loot
2. (tr) to rob or steal (choice or desirable things) from (a place): to plunder an orchard.
n
3. anything taken by plundering or theft; booty
4. the act of plundering; pillage
[C17: probably from Dutch plunderen (originally: to plunder household goods); compare Middle High German plunder bedding, household goods]
ˈplunderable adj
ˈplunderer n
ˈplunderous adj

plun•der

(ˈplʌn dər)

v.t.
1. to rob of goods or valuables by open force, as in war: to plunder a town.
2. to rob or fleece: to plunder the public treasury.
3. to take by pillage, robbery, or fraud.
v.i.
4. to take plunder; pillage.
n.
5. plundering or pillage.
6. that which is taken in plundering; loot.
7. anything taken by robbery, theft, or fraud.
[1620–30; < Dutch plunderen]
plun′der•a•ble, adj.
plun′der•er, n.
plun′der•ing•ly, adv.
plun′der•ous, adj.

plunder

- Etymologically, it means "rob of household goods," from Dutch plunde/plunne, "household goods."
See also related terms for rob.

plunder


Past participle: plundered
Gerund: plundering

Imperative
plunder
plunder
Present
I plunder
you plunder
he/she/it plunders
we plunder
you plunder
they plunder
Preterite
I plundered
you plundered
he/she/it plundered
we plundered
you plundered
they plundered
Present Continuous
I am plundering
you are plundering
he/she/it is plundering
we are plundering
you are plundering
they are plundering
Present Perfect
I have plundered
you have plundered
he/she/it has plundered
we have plundered
you have plundered
they have plundered
Past Continuous
I was plundering
you were plundering
he/she/it was plundering
we were plundering
you were plundering
they were plundering
Past Perfect
I had plundered
you had plundered
he/she/it had plundered
we had plundered
you had plundered
they had plundered
Future
I will plunder
you will plunder
he/she/it will plunder
we will plunder
you will plunder
they will plunder
Future Perfect
I will have plundered
you will have plundered
he/she/it will have plundered
we will have plundered
you will have plundered
they will have plundered
Future Continuous
I will be plundering
you will be plundering
he/she/it will be plundering
we will be plundering
you will be plundering
they will be plundering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been plundering
you have been plundering
he/she/it has been plundering
we have been plundering
you have been plundering
they have been plundering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been plundering
you will have been plundering
he/she/it will have been plundering
we will have been plundering
you will have been plundering
they will have been plundering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been plundering
you had been plundering
he/she/it had been plundering
we had been plundering
you had been plundering
they had been plundering
Conditional
I would plunder
you would plunder
he/she/it would plunder
we would plunder
you would plunder
they would plunder
Past Conditional
I would have plundered
you would have plundered
he/she/it would have plundered
we would have plundered
you would have plundered
they would have plundered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plunder - goods or money obtained illegallyplunder - goods or money obtained illegally  
stolen property - property that has been stolen
cut - a share of the profits; "everyone got a cut of the earnings"
Verb1.plunder - take illegally; of intellectual property; "This writer plundered from famous authors"
crime, criminal offence, criminal offense, law-breaking, offense, offence - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
steal - take without the owner's consent; "Someone stole my wallet on the train"; "This author stole entire paragraphs from my dissertation"
2.plunder - plunder (a town) after capture; "the barbarians sacked Rome"
take - take by force; "Hitler took the Baltic Republics"; "The army took the fort on the hill"
3.plunder - steal goods; take as spoils; "During the earthquake people looted the stores that were deserted by their owners"
take - take by force; "Hitler took the Baltic Republics"; "The army took the fort on the hill"
deplume, displume - strip of honors, possessions, or attributes
4.plunder - destroy and strip of its possession; "The soldiers raped the beautiful country"
ruin, destroy - destroy completely; damage irreparably; "You have ruined my car by pouring sugar in the tank!"; "The tears ruined her make-up"

plunder

verb
1. loot, strip, sack, rob, raid, devastate, spoil, rifle, ravage, ransack, pillage, despoil They plundered and burned the town.
2. steal, rob, take, nick (informal), trouser (slang), pinch (informal), knock off (slang), embezzle, pilfer, thieve a settlement to recover money plundered from government coffers
noun
1. pillage, sacking, robbery, marauding, rapine, spoliation a guerrilla group infamous for torture and plunder
2. loot, spoils, prey, booty, swag (slang), ill-gotten gains Pirates swarmed the seas in search of easy plunder.

plunder

verb
To rob of goods by force, especially in time of war:
Archaic: harrow, spoil.
noun
Goods or property seized unlawfully, especially by a victor in wartime:
booty, loot, pillage, spoil (used in plural).
Slang: boodle.
Nautical: prize.
Translations
مَغْنَم، ما يُنْهَبيَسْلُب، يَنْهَب
kořistlupplenit
bytteplyndre
fosztogatkifosztkirabolzsákmány
rænaránsfengur
grobikas
izlaupītlaupījumslaupīt
plundra
ganimetyağmayağmalamak

plunder

[ˈplʌndəʳ]
A. N (= act) → pillaje m, saqueo m; (= loot) → botín m
B. VTpillar, saquear; [+ tomb] → robar; [+ safe] → robar (el contenido de)
they plundered my cellarme saquearon la bodega

plunder

[ˈplʌndər]
n
[place] → pillage m
(= stolen goods) → butin m
vt
(= loot) [+ place] → piller
(= steal) [+ valuables, antiquities] → voler; [+ public money] → détourner
to plunder from government funds → détourner des fonds publics
They plundered £4 billion from government funds → Ils ont détourné 4 milliards de livres de fonds publics.

plunder

n
(= act) (of place)Plünderung f; (of things)Raub m
(= loot)Beute f
vt placeplündern (also hum); (completely) → ausplündern; peopleausplündern; thingrauben
viplündern

plunder

[ˈplʌndəʳ]
1. n (act) → saccheggio; (loot) → bottino
2. vt (gen) → saccheggiare; (villagers) → depredare; (objects) → far man bassa di

plunder

(ˈplandə) verb
to rob or steal from (a place). The soldiers plundered and looted (the city).
noun
the things stolen. They ran off with their plunder.
ˈplunderer noun
References in classic literature ?
The thieves are outlying for scalps and plunder," said the white man, whom we shall call Hawkeye, after the manner of his companions.
Merchant ships are but extension bridges; armed ones but floating forts; even pirates and privateers, though following the sea as highwaymen the road, they but plunder other ships, other fragments of the land like themselves, without seeking to draw their living from the bottomless deep itself.
There was the police department, and the fire and water departments, and the whole balance of the civil list, from the meanest office boy to the head of a city department; and for the horde who could find no room in these, there was the world of vice and crime, there was license to seduce, to swindle and plunder and prey.
He could have gone home much the richest citizen of his country, and it might have been years before the plunder was missed; but he was human--he could not enjoy his delight alone, he must have somebody to talk about it with.
The skiff was half full of plunder which that gang had stole there on the wreck.
They would smouch provisions from the pantry whenever they got a chance; or a brass thimble, or a cake of wax, or an emery bag, or a paper of needles, or a silver spoon, or a dollar bill, or small articles of clothing, or any other property of light value; and so far were they from considering such reprisals sinful, that they would go to church and shout and pray the loudest and sincerest with their plunder in their pockets.
As one who pretended to do nothing but plunder and forage where he could, the Farmer-General--howsoever his matrimonial relations conduced to social morality--was at least the greatest reality among the personages who attended at the hotel of Monseigneur that day.
But the gallantry of her friends would not allow of this; and the man in faded black, mounting the breach first, produced his plunder.
Upon the slightest and most unreasonable pretences, as well as upon accusations the most absurd and groundless, their persons and property were exposed to every turn of popular fury; for Norman, Saxon, Dane, and Briton, however adverse these races were to each other, contended which should look with greatest detestation upon a people, whom it was accounted a point of religion to hate, to revile, to despise, to plunder, and to persecute.
Besides, he did something to destroy the anarchy that enabled him to plunder society with impunity.
Their design was to turn pirates and, plunder the Spaniards, which they could not do till they got more men.
The Portuguese, who were more desirous of glory than wealth, did not encumber themselves with plunder, but with the utmost expedition pursued their enemies, in hopes of cutting them entirely off.