plunderer


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plun·der

 (plŭn′dər)
v. plun·dered, plun·der·ing, plun·ders
v.tr.
1. To rob of goods by force, especially in time of war; pillage: plunder a village.
2. To seize wrongfully or by force; steal: plundered the supplies.
v.intr.
To take booty; rob.
n.
1. The act or practice of plundering.
2. Property stolen by fraud or force; booty.

[German plündern, from Middle High German plundern, from Middle Low German plunder, household goods.]

plun′der·a·ble adj.
plun′der·er n.
plun′der·ous adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plunderer - someone who takes spoils or plunder (as in war)plunderer - someone who takes spoils or plunder (as in war)
war, warfare - the waging of armed conflict against an enemy; "thousands of people were killed in the war"
buccaneer, sea robber, sea rover, pirate - someone who robs at sea or plunders the land from the sea without having a commission from any sovereign nation
stealer, thief - a criminal who takes property belonging to someone else with the intention of keeping it or selling it
Translations
سالِب، ناهِب، لِص
plenitel
røver
ræningi
kto drancuje/plieni

plunderer

[ˈplʌndərəʳ] Nsaqueador(a) m/f

plunderer

nPlünderer m, → Plünderin f

plunderer

[ˈplʌndrəʳ] npredone m, saccheggiatore/trice

plunder

(ˈplandə) verb
to rob or steal from (a place). The soldiers plundered and looted (the city).
noun
the things stolen. They ran off with their plunder.
ˈplunderer noun
References in classic literature ?
Faria has dreamed this; the Cardinal Spada buried no treasure here; perhaps he never came here, or if he did, Caesar Borgia, the intrepid adventurer, the stealthy and indefatigable plunderer, has followed him, discovered his traces, pursued them as I have done, raised the stone, and descending before me, has left me nothing.
Even here they are subject to occasional visits from their implacable foes, as long as they have horses, or any other property to tempt the plunderer.
It would be superfluous to go through all particulars; for the rule of conduct which the tyrant ought to pursue is evident enough, and that is, to affect to appear not the tyrant, but the king; the guardian of those he governs, not their plunderer, [1315b] but their protector, and to affect the middle rank in life, not one superior to all others: he should, therefore, associate his nobles with him and soothe his people; for his government will not only be necessarily more honourable and worthy of imitation, as it will be over men of worth, and not abject wretches who perpetually both hate and fear him; but it will be also more durable.
So surely as a great nation has weakened with prosperity, so that her limbs have lost their suppleness and her finger joints have stiffened, so surely does the plunderer come in good time.
By mid- day they passed through Tillingham, which, strangely enough, seemed to be quite silent and deserted, save for a few furtive plunderers hunting for food.
The Vigilance bands that had at first shot plunderers very freely were now either entirely dispersed by the plague, or busy between town and cemetery in a vain attempt to keep pace with it.
Then the approach to the confused problems of some larger centre of population and the presence of a more intricate conflict would be marked by roughly smeared notices of "Quarantine" or "Strangers Shot," or by a string of decaying plunderers dangling from the telephone poles at the roadside.
But the first plunderers were followed by a second and a third contingent, and with increasing numbers plundering became more and more difficult and assumed more definite forms.
The more the plundering by the French continued, the more both the wealth of Moscow and the strength of its plunderers was destroyed.
Here, with a very few words of explanation, mingled with scarce but ominous denunciations against the plunderers, he made his wife acquainted with the state of things on the prairie, and announced his own determination to compensate himself for his broken rest, by devoting the remainder of the night to sleep.
The deserted counting-houses, with their secrets of books and papers locked up in chests and safes; the banking-houses, with their secrets of strong rooms and wells, the keys of which were in a very few secret pockets and a very few secret breasts; the secrets of all the dispersed grinders in the vast mill, among whom there were doubtless plunderers, forgers, and trust-betrayers of many sorts, whom the light of any day that dawned might reveal; he could have fancied that these things, in hiding, imparted a heaviness to the air.
Not blaming me for standing on my own defence against a crew of plunderers, who could suck me dry by driblets?