plunder

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plun·der

 (plŭn′dər)
v. plun·dered, plun·der·ing, plun·ders
v.tr.
1. To rob of goods by force, especially in time of war; pillage: plunder a village.
2. To seize wrongfully or by force; steal: plundered the supplies.
v.intr.
To take booty; rob.
n.
1. The act or practice of plundering.
2. Property stolen by fraud or force; booty.

[German plündern, from Middle High German plundern, from Middle Low German plunder, household goods.]

plun′der·a·ble adj.
plun′der·er n.
plun′der·ous adj.

plunder

(ˈplʌndə)
vb
1. to steal (valuables, goods, sacred items, etc) from (a town, church, etc) by force, esp in time of war; loot
2. (tr) to rob or steal (choice or desirable things) from (a place): to plunder an orchard.
n
3. anything taken by plundering or theft; booty
4. the act of plundering; pillage
[C17: probably from Dutch plunderen (originally: to plunder household goods); compare Middle High German plunder bedding, household goods]
ˈplunderable adj
ˈplunderer n
ˈplunderous adj

plun•der

(ˈplʌn dər)

v.t.
1. to rob of goods or valuables by open force, as in war: to plunder a town.
2. to rob or fleece: to plunder the public treasury.
3. to take by pillage, robbery, or fraud.
v.i.
4. to take plunder; pillage.
n.
5. plundering or pillage.
6. that which is taken in plundering; loot.
7. anything taken by robbery, theft, or fraud.
[1620–30; < Dutch plunderen]
plun′der•a•ble, adj.
plun′der•er, n.
plun′der•ing•ly, adv.
plun′der•ous, adj.

plunder

- Etymologically, it means "rob of household goods," from Dutch plunde/plunne, "household goods."
See also related terms for rob.

plunder


Past participle: plundered
Gerund: plundering

Imperative
plunder
plunder
Present
I plunder
you plunder
he/she/it plunders
we plunder
you plunder
they plunder
Preterite
I plundered
you plundered
he/she/it plundered
we plundered
you plundered
they plundered
Present Continuous
I am plundering
you are plundering
he/she/it is plundering
we are plundering
you are plundering
they are plundering
Present Perfect
I have plundered
you have plundered
he/she/it has plundered
we have plundered
you have plundered
they have plundered
Past Continuous
I was plundering
you were plundering
he/she/it was plundering
we were plundering
you were plundering
they were plundering
Past Perfect
I had plundered
you had plundered
he/she/it had plundered
we had plundered
you had plundered
they had plundered
Future
I will plunder
you will plunder
he/she/it will plunder
we will plunder
you will plunder
they will plunder
Future Perfect
I will have plundered
you will have plundered
he/she/it will have plundered
we will have plundered
you will have plundered
they will have plundered
Future Continuous
I will be plundering
you will be plundering
he/she/it will be plundering
we will be plundering
you will be plundering
they will be plundering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been plundering
you have been plundering
he/she/it has been plundering
we have been plundering
you have been plundering
they have been plundering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been plundering
you will have been plundering
he/she/it will have been plundering
we will have been plundering
you will have been plundering
they will have been plundering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been plundering
you had been plundering
he/she/it had been plundering
we had been plundering
you had been plundering
they had been plundering
Conditional
I would plunder
you would plunder
he/she/it would plunder
we would plunder
you would plunder
they would plunder
Past Conditional
I would have plundered
you would have plundered
he/she/it would have plundered
we would have plundered
you would have plundered
they would have plundered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plunder - goods or money obtained illegallyplunder - goods or money obtained illegally  
stolen property - property that has been stolen
cut - a share of the profits; "everyone got a cut of the earnings"
Verb1.plunder - take illegally; of intellectual property; "This writer plundered from famous authors"
crime, criminal offence, criminal offense, law-breaking, offense, offence - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
steal - take without the owner's consent; "Someone stole my wallet on the train"; "This author stole entire paragraphs from my dissertation"
2.plunder - plunder (a town) after capture; "the barbarians sacked Rome"
take - take by force; "Hitler took the Baltic Republics"; "The army took the fort on the hill"
3.plunder - steal goods; take as spoils; "During the earthquake people looted the stores that were deserted by their owners"
take - take by force; "Hitler took the Baltic Republics"; "The army took the fort on the hill"
deplume, displume - strip of honors, possessions, or attributes
4.plunder - destroy and strip of its possession; "The soldiers raped the beautiful country"
ruin, destroy - destroy completely; damage irreparably; "You have ruined my car by pouring sugar in the tank!"; "The tears ruined her make-up"

plunder

verb
1. loot, strip, sack, rob, raid, devastate, spoil, rifle, ravage, ransack, pillage, despoil They plundered and burned the town.
2. steal, rob, take, nick (informal), trouser (slang), pinch (informal), knock off (slang), embezzle, pilfer, thieve a settlement to recover money plundered from government coffers
noun
1. pillage, sacking, robbery, marauding, rapine, spoliation a guerrilla group infamous for torture and plunder
2. loot, spoils, prey, booty, swag (slang), ill-gotten gains Pirates swarmed the seas in search of easy plunder.

plunder

verb
To rob of goods by force, especially in time of war:
Archaic: harrow, spoil.
noun
Goods or property seized unlawfully, especially by a victor in wartime:
booty, loot, pillage, spoil (used in plural).
Slang: boodle.
Nautical: prize.
Translations
مَغْنَم، ما يُنْهَبيَسْلُب، يَنْهَب
kořistlupplenit
bytteplyndre
fosztogatkifosztkirabolzsákmány
rænaránsfengur
grobikas
izlaupītlaupījumslaupīt
plundra
ganimetyağmayağmalamak

plunder

[ˈplʌndəʳ]
A. N (= act) → pillaje m, saqueo m; (= loot) → botín m
B. VTpillar, saquear; [+ tomb] → robar; [+ safe] → robar (el contenido de)
they plundered my cellarme saquearon la bodega

plunder

[ˈplʌndər]
n
[place] → pillage m
(= stolen goods) → butin m
vt
(= loot) [+ place] → piller
(= steal) [+ valuables, antiquities] → voler; [+ public money] → détourner
to plunder from government funds → détourner des fonds publics
They plundered £4 billion from government funds → Ils ont détourné 4 milliards de livres de fonds publics.

plunder

n
(= act) (of place)Plünderung f; (of things)Raub m
(= loot)Beute f
vt placeplündern (also hum); (completely) → ausplündern; peopleausplündern; thingrauben
viplündern

plunder

[ˈplʌndəʳ]
1. n (act) → saccheggio; (loot) → bottino
2. vt (gen) → saccheggiare; (villagers) → depredare; (objects) → far man bassa di

plunder

(ˈplandə) verb
to rob or steal from (a place). The soldiers plundered and looted (the city).
noun
the things stolen. They ran off with their plunder.
ˈplunderer noun
References in classic literature ?
A kind of transaction in which A plunders from B the
Merchant ships are but extension bridges; armed ones but floating forts; even pirates and privateers, though following the sea as highwaymen the road, they but plunder other ships, other fragments of the land like themselves, without seeking to draw their living from the bottomless deep itself.
Now and then the people wondered why nothing was heard of the raider, or of the stolen knife or the other plunder, but nobody was able to throw any light on that matter.
The Portuguese, who were more desirous of glory than wealth, did not encumber themselves with plunder, but with the utmost expedition pursued their enemies, in hopes of cutting them entirely off.
Continuing his discourse Don Quixote said: "As we began in the student's case with poverty and its accompaniments, let us see now if the soldier is richer, and we shall find that in poverty itself there is no one poorer; for he is dependent on his miserable pay, which comes late or never, or else on what he can plunder, seriously imperilling his life and conscience; and sometimes his nakedness will be so great that a slashed doublet serves him for uniform and shirt, and in the depth of winter he has to defend himself against the inclemency of the weather in the open field with nothing better than the breath of his mouth, which I need not say, coming from an empty place, must come out cold, contrary to the laws of nature.
When you plunder a countryside, let the spoil be divided amongst your men; when you capture new territory, cut it up into allotments for the benefit of the soldiery.
In the year 1690 he went on a military expedition against the French colonies in America, conquered the whole province of Acadia, and returned to Boston with a great deal of plunder.
When he had left the horses and the troops behind him, he made all speed on his way, but Ulysses perceived his coming and said to Diomed, "Diomed, here is some one from the camp; I am not sure whether he is a spy, or whether it is some thief who would plunder the bodies of the dead; let him get a little past us, we can then spring upon him and take him.
If ye plunder his Kill from a weaker, devour not all in thy pride; Pack-Right is the right of the meanest; so leave him the head and the hide.
and what if they be guilty of the same rapine and plunder the possessions of the majority, that will be as right as the other: but that all things of this sort are wrong and unjust is evident.