plunging

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plunge

 (plŭnj)
v. plunged, plung·ing, plung·es
v.intr.
1.
a. To dive, jump, or throw oneself: We plunged into the lake.
b. To fall rapidly: The car went off the road and plunged into the gully.
2. To devote oneself to or undertake an activity earnestly or wholeheartedly: I plunged into my studies. She plunged ahead with her plan.
3. To enter or move headlong through something: The hunting dogs plunged into the forest.
4. To slope steeply downward: a cliff that plunges to the sea.
5. To move forward and downward violently: The ship plunged through rough seas.
6. To become suddenly lower; decrease dramatically: Stock prices plunged during the banking crisis.
v.tr.
1. To thrust or throw forcefully into a substance or place: plunged the eggs into the hot water; plunged the fork into the potato.
2. To cast suddenly, violently, or deeply into a given state or situation: "The street was plunged in cool shadow" (Richard Wright).
3. To use a plunger to try to unblock (a drain, for example).
n.
1. The act or an instance of plunging: a plunge off the dock.
2. A swim; a dip.
3. A sudden or dramatic decline: a plunge in prices.
Idiom:
take the plunge Informal
To begin an unfamiliar venture, especially after hesitating: After a three-year engagement, they're finally taking the plunge.

[Middle English plungen, from Old French plongier, from Vulgar Latin *plumbicāre, to heave a sounding lead, from Latin plumbum, lead.]

plunging

(ˈplʌndʒɪŋ)
adj
(of a neckline or dress) showing a lot of a woman's chest
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

plunging

adjective
Cut to reveal the wearer's neck, chest, and back:
Translations

plunging

[ˈplʌndʒɪŋ] ADJ plunging necklineescote m muy bajo

plunging

[ˈplʌndʒɪŋ] adj [neckline] → plongeant(e)

plunging

adj
neckline, backtief ausgeschnitten; her deeply plunging necklineder tiefe Ausschnitt ihres Kleides
(= decreasing) cost, currency, pricesstark fallend

plunging

[ˈplʌndʒɪŋ] adj (neckline) → profondo/a; (back of dress) → profondamente scollato/a
References in classic literature ?
Like one who after a night of drunken revelry hies to his bed, still reeling, but with conscience yet pricking him, as the plungings of the Roman race-horse but so much the more strike his steel tags into him; as one who in that miserable plight still turns and turns in giddy anguish, praying God for annihilation until the fit be passed; and at last amid the whirl of woe he feels, a deep stupor steals over him, as over the man who bleeds to death, for conscience is the wound, and there's naught to staunch it; so, after sore wrestlings in his berth, Jonah's prodigy of ponderous misery drags him drowning down to sleep.
I saw the opening maw of hell, With endless pains and sorrows there; Which none but they that feel can tell-- Oh, I was plunging to despair.
A number of these sweatings and plungings having, as he supposed, rendered his person perfectly "inodorous," he resumed his trapping with renovated hope.
14) Plunging into abyme, then, is (in part) plunging into writing, or differance, which is precisely the condition of ruinous sell-dispossession, of writing the self.
I tried again, plunging into the blackness of my mind.
These questions are-- unmistakably--left unanswered, open: His movement underground to the plunging trains as "We, he, him--my mind and I" does nothing to stabilize his identity.
The conditions of your decision make your choice clear bec ause you have reduced the potentially infinite activity of plunging the name of history to a binary condition.
The first several appearances of plunging after Clifton's remarks occur just before Clifton is killed.
Clifton does this definitively a page later, which pushes Invisible Man further, or intensifies his plunging.