pluperfect


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plu·per·fect

 (plo͞o-pûr′fĭkt)
adj.
1. Of or being a verb tense used to express action completed before a specified or implied past time.
2. More than perfect; supremely accomplished; ideal: "He has won a reputation as [a] pluperfect bureaucrat" (New York Times).
n.
1. The pluperfect tense, formed in English with the past participle of a verb and the auxiliary had, as had learned in the sentence He had learned to type by the end of the semester. Also called past perfect.
2. A verb or form in the pluperfect tense.

[Middle English pluperfyth, alteration of Latin plūs quam perfectum, more than perfect : plūs, more; see pelə- in Indo-European roots + quam, than + perfectum, neuter past participle of perficere, to complete; see perfect.]

pluperfect

(pluːˈpɜːfɪkt)
adj, n
(Grammar) grammar another term for past perfect
[C16: from the Latin phrase plūs quam perfectum more than perfect]

plu•per•fect

(pluˈpɜr fɪkt)
adj.
2. more than perfect: speaking with pluperfect precision.
n.
[1520–30; < Latin plū(s quam)perfectum (more than) perfect, translation of Greek hypersyntelikós]

pluperfect

Used to describe a verb form that expresses an action, that has been completed before the time of speaking, as in “We had walked.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pluperfect - a perfective tense used to express action completed in the past; "`I had finished' is an example of the past perfect"
perfect, perfect tense, perfective, perfective tense - a tense of verbs used in describing action that has been completed (sometimes regarded as perfective aspect)
Adj.1.pluperfect - more than perfect; "he spoke with pluperfect precision"
perfect - being complete of its kind and without defect or blemish; "a perfect circle"; "a perfect reproduction"; "perfect happiness"; "perfect manners"; "a perfect specimen"; "a perfect day"
Translations
pluskvamperfekti
pretérito mais-que-perfeito

pluperfect

[ˈpluːˈpɜːfɪkt] N (Ling) → pluscuamperfecto m

pluperfect

[ˌpluːˈpɜːrfɪkt] nplus-que-parfait m
the pluperfect → le plus-que-parfait

pluperfect

adjin der Vorvergangenheit, im Plusquamperfekt; pluperfect tenseVorvergangenheit f, → Plusquamperfekt nt

pluperfect

[ˌpluːˈpɜːfɪkt] n (Gram) → piuccheperfetto
References in classic literature ?
Butcher and Lang translate it as a pluperfect, but surely Charybdis was in the act of sucking down the water when Ulysses arrived.
We ought to use the pluperfect and say wakened, but woke is better and was always used by Peter.
It is a pluperfect or beyond perfect example of the defensive function implied in the creation mythos.
This could have large economic consequences, so Merkley, caught between liberal environmentalists and timber and other agricultural interests, supports a measure that is pluperfect liberalism: Let's spend $15 million to study how birds and bipeds can coexist.
The topics includenarrative tenses for naitre and mourir in French andItalian, toward a unified account of the present perfect in Catalan and English, non-conventional uses of the pluperfect in Italian (and German) literary prose, some observations from the current evolution of the Romanian presumptive, and modals and tense in contemporary European Portuguese and in Old Portuguese.
substance--not a pluperfect fulfillment, or, if so, then only
Roy's wagyu beef sliders, dressed in caramelized onions and chipotle aioli, are outstanding and come with pluperfect sweet potato fries.
21) More specifically, they are suppletive in the third person plural of the medio-passive indicative perfect and pluperfect of verbs with consonant-final roots verbs, and the medio-passive subjunctive and optative perfect.
I want to emphasize the pluperfect subjunctive and anterior future of integrating.
For example, in the Estonian equivalent of Example 13 (see Example 14) one would normally use a form of the oblique mood (olevat 'is said to be') at the beginning of the sentence, followed by an evidential strategy (indicative pluperfect oli utelnud 'had said'), and leave the predicates of the conditional sentence unmarked in relation to evidentiality (cf.
preterit * dar-ket-om ba-m-ke der-em-xuss be-sud-om * sud-om dar-e-ket-om * m-e-ke der-em-e-xuss perfect * be-sude * dar-kete * ba-m-kerde der-em-xusse hom horn pluperfect * besude darkete budom * bamkerde * derentxusse budom bu bu future * kem-em * kem-ern ket * kem-em ke * kem-em xuss su
It would be inaccurate to say it inheres in the beautiful precision of the verbs, in the equipoise of the clauses, freighted as they are with the pluperfect and the past conditional, because the English translation lacks none of its clarity.