pluperfect


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plu·per·fect

 (plo͞o-pûr′fĭkt)
adj.
1. Of or being a verb tense used to express action completed before a specified or implied past time.
2. More than perfect; supremely accomplished; ideal: "He has won a reputation as [a] pluperfect bureaucrat" (New York Times).
n.
1. The pluperfect tense, formed in English with the past participle of a verb and the auxiliary had, as had learned in the sentence He had learned to type by the end of the semester. Also called past perfect.
2. A verb or form in the pluperfect tense.

[Middle English pluperfyth, alteration of Latin plūs quam perfectum, more than perfect : plūs, more; see pelə- in Indo-European roots + quam, than + perfectum, neuter past participle of perficere, to complete; see perfect.]

pluperfect

(pluːˈpɜːfɪkt)
adj, n
(Grammar) grammar another term for past perfect
[C16: from the Latin phrase plūs quam perfectum more than perfect]

plu•per•fect

(pluˈpɜr fɪkt)
adj.
2. more than perfect: speaking with pluperfect precision.
n.
[1520–30; < Latin plū(s quam)perfectum (more than) perfect, translation of Greek hypersyntelikós]

pluperfect

Used to describe a verb form that expresses an action, that has been completed before the time of speaking, as in “We had walked.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pluperfect - a perfective tense used to express action completed in the past; "`I had finished' is an example of the past perfect"
perfect, perfect tense, perfective, perfective tense - a tense of verbs used in describing action that has been completed (sometimes regarded as perfective aspect)
Adj.1.pluperfect - more than perfect; "he spoke with pluperfect precision"
perfect - being complete of its kind and without defect or blemish; "a perfect circle"; "a perfect reproduction"; "perfect happiness"; "perfect manners"; "a perfect specimen"; "a perfect day"
Translations
pluskvamperfekti
pretérito mais-que-perfeito

pluperfect

[ˈpluːˈpɜːfɪkt] N (Ling) → pluscuamperfecto m

pluperfect

[ˌpluːˈpɜːrfɪkt] nplus-que-parfait m
the pluperfect → le plus-que-parfait

pluperfect

adjin der Vorvergangenheit, im Plusquamperfekt; pluperfect tenseVorvergangenheit f, → Plusquamperfekt nt

pluperfect

[ˌpluːˈpɜːfɪkt] n (Gram) → piuccheperfetto
References in classic literature ?
We ought to use the pluperfect and say wakened, but woke is better and was always used by Peter.
Butcher and Lang translate it as a pluperfect, but surely Charybdis was in the act of sucking down the water when Ulysses arrived.
I still struggle to remember what a pluperfect tense is, and school that been taught a more fun was normally it doesn't matter.
25, it credits three co-authors: the subject himself, his life-long buddy Jorge Arago who passed away in 2015, and Angela Stuart-Santiago, in whose hands this testament to entwined lives, creativity and a memorable milieu became a labor of love enhanced by pluperfect strategic decisions.
The pluperfect is used as a vehicle for examining motives or cataloguing regrets, as in "Refrain" with its, "All along we had wanted the next thing," or "Itinerary of Fire," in which the speaker observes, "Had we been given a simpler itinerary / we might have come to a different door.
For example, the closest English verb form to the Spanish PretAaAaAeA@ri Pluscuamperfecto de Subjuntivo (Subjunctive Pluperfect Past, a stereotypical verb form for events that might have happened, but did not; "si yo hubiera sonreAaAaAeA do, ella me habrAaAaAeA a mirado") is the Third Conditi ("If I had smiled, she would have looked at me").
31) Sparks argues that attempts to render "God formed" in Genesis 2:19 to the pluperfect "God had formed," as seen in evangelical Bibles such as the NIV, "does not suit the immediate context, where God works to resolve Adam's solitude" (Kenton L.
Josef's hyperawareness of sound is matched by Kundera's use of euphony in describing Josef's alienation to it (for example, the bass note of "etait" in the past tense or as an auxiliary verb for the pluperfect, and the use of alliteration or consonance, so we can hear Josef's frustration and a monotonous sound).
Emerging values of Pluperfect in Andean Spanish (Chinchero, Cusco)
The exclusive use of the imperfect and pluperfect tenses allows the reader to experience the text as a reader who is not asked to participate in the episode's narration, nor to question the events narrated.
Among the topics are the present tense by conjugation, first and second declension adjectives, uses of the genitive, pluperfect and future perfect active, passive of the perfect system, demonstratives, direct questions, vocative and locative, indefinite adjectives, the ablative absolute, and fourth and fifth declensions.
The hallmark of pluperfect respectability': the early development of golf in Irish society.