pluperfect

(redirected from pluperfects)
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Related to pluperfects: past perfect tense

plu·per·fect

 (plo͞o-pûr′fĭkt)
adj.
1. Of or being a verb tense used to express action completed before a specified or implied past time.
2. More than perfect; supremely accomplished; ideal: "He has won a reputation as [a] pluperfect bureaucrat" (New York Times).
n.
1. The pluperfect tense, formed in English with the past participle of a verb and the auxiliary had, as had learned in the sentence He had learned to type by the end of the semester. Also called past perfect.
2. A verb or form in the pluperfect tense.

[Middle English pluperfyth, alteration of Latin plūs quam perfectum, more than perfect : plūs, more; see pelə- in Indo-European roots + quam, than + perfectum, neuter past participle of perficere, to complete; see perfect.]

pluperfect

(pluːˈpɜːfɪkt)
adj, n
(Grammar) grammar another term for past perfect
[C16: from the Latin phrase plūs quam perfectum more than perfect]

plu•per•fect

(pluˈpɜr fɪkt)
adj.
2. more than perfect: speaking with pluperfect precision.
n.
[1520–30; < Latin plū(s quam)perfectum (more than) perfect, translation of Greek hypersyntelikós]

pluperfect

Used to describe a verb form that expresses an action, that has been completed before the time of speaking, as in “We had walked.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pluperfect - a perfective tense used to express action completed in the past; "`I had finished' is an example of the past perfect"
perfect, perfect tense, perfective, perfective tense - a tense of verbs used in describing action that has been completed (sometimes regarded as perfective aspect)
Adj.1.pluperfect - more than perfect; "he spoke with pluperfect precision"
perfect - being complete of its kind and without defect or blemish; "a perfect circle"; "a perfect reproduction"; "perfect happiness"; "perfect manners"; "a perfect specimen"; "a perfect day"
Translations
pluskvamperfekti
pretérito mais-que-perfeito

pluperfect

[ˈpluːˈpɜːfɪkt] N (Ling) → pluscuamperfecto m

pluperfect

[ˌpluːˈpɜːrfɪkt] nplus-que-parfait m
the pluperfect → le plus-que-parfait

pluperfect

adjin der Vorvergangenheit, im Plusquamperfekt; pluperfect tenseVorvergangenheit f, → Plusquamperfekt nt

pluperfect

[ˌpluːˈpɜːfɪkt] n (Gram) → piuccheperfetto
References in classic literature ?
Butcher and Lang translate it as a pluperfect, but surely Charybdis was in the act of sucking down the water when Ulysses arrived.
We ought to use the pluperfect and say wakened, but woke is better and was always used by Peter.
Winkler's set of preterites and pluperfects looks a bit strange: this implies the existence of perfect, too.
above) are in no way perfects, and, therefore, may hardly be called pluperfects.
In addition to this diversity of forms there exists a chaotic variety of definitions (preterite, imperfect, perfect, pluperfect, preteritum perfect, preteritum imperfect, historical imperfect, past non-finite, past continuos etc.
Nasibullin's participle in -em + PX + van '(there) is'), "indifferent pluperfect I" ("preterite I" in -i- + val), "perfective pluperfect II" (R.
In the same section we introduced tests, based on the literature and adapted to our purpose, to select one of the three possible interpretations for individual pluperfects.
Determine the temporal relation between the eventualities expressed by the two pluperfects.
In total, 267 Dutch fragments containing pluperfects were selected: 142 fragments came from several novels and short stories -- representing fictional narrative -- written by Dutch authors (Dorrestein 1997; Enquist 1997; Hemmerechs 1993; Melchior 1993; Reisel 1993; Romijn Meijer 1983; De Winter 1993), and 125 fragments came from a major Dutch newspaper (de Volkskrant).
The proposal by linguists and narratologists that the pluperfect may be used to introduce perspective has not been founded in the (formal) semantics of tense and aspect.
We will examine the question of when and why a pluperfect in Dutch can introduce perspective.
In sum, the notion of temporal perspective that we find in the literature on formal discourse semantics, and most prominently in relation to the pluperfect, is not connected to a notion of narrative perspective.