pluralism


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plu·ral·ism

 (plo͝or′ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The condition of being multiple or plural.
2.
a. A condition in which numerous distinct ethnic, religious, or cultural groups are present and tolerated within a society.
b. The belief that such a condition is desirable or socially beneficial.
3. Ecclesiastical The holding by one person of two or more positions or offices, especially two or more ecclesiastical benefices, at the same time.
4. Philosophy
a. The doctrine that reality is composed of many ultimate substances.
b. The belief that no single explanatory system or view of reality can account for all the phenomena of life.

pluralism

(ˈplʊərəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the holding by a single person of more than one ecclesiastical benefice or office
2. (Sociology) sociol a theory of society as several autonomous but interdependent groups which either share power or continuously compete for power
3. (Sociology) the existence in a society of groups having distinctive ethnic origin, cultural forms, religions, etc
4. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) a theory that views the power of employers as being balanced by the power of trade unions in industrial relations such that the interests of both sides can be catered for
5. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. the metaphysical doctrine that reality consists of more than two basic types of substance. Compare monism2, dualism2
b. the metaphysical doctrine that reality consists of independent entities rather than one unchanging whole. Compare monism2, absolutism2b
ˈpluralist n, adj
ˌpluralˈistic adj

plu•ral•ism

(ˈplʊər əˌlɪz əm)

n.
1. (in philosophy)
a. a theory that there is more than one basic substance or principle. Compare dualism (def. 2a), monism (def. 1a).
b. a theory that reality consists of two or more independent elements.
2.
a. a condition in which minority groups participate fully in the dominant society, yet maintain their cultural differences.
b. a doctrine that society benefits from such a condition.
3. the holding by one person of two or more church offices at the same time.
4. the state or quality of being plural.
[1810–20]
plu′ral•ist, n., adj.
plu`ral•is′tic, adj.
plu`ral•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

pluralism

1. Ecclesiastic. the holding of two or more church offices by a single person.
2. the state or condition of a common civilization in which various ethnic, racial, or religious groups are free to participate in and develop their common cultures.
3. a policy or principle supporting such cultural plurality. — pluralist, n. — pluralistic, adj.
See also: Politics
1. a theory positing more than one principle or basic substance as the ground of reality. Cf. dualism, monism.
2. a theory that reality consists, not of an organic whole, but of two or more independent material or spiritual entities. — pluralist, n.pluralistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy

pluralism

1. The belief that there are more than one or two substances in the world, such as mind and matter.
2. A situation in which several different ethnic or cultural groups coexist within a society.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pluralism - a social organization in which diversity of racial or religious or ethnic or cultural groups is tolerated
social organisation, social organization, social structure, social system, structure - the people in a society considered as a system organized by a characteristic pattern of relationships; "the social organization of England and America is very different"; "sociologists have studied the changing structure of the family"
2.pluralism - the doctrine that reality consists of several basic substances or elements
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
monism - the doctrine that reality consists of a single basic substance or element
3.pluralism - the practice of one person holding more than one benefice at a time
practice, pattern - a customary way of operation or behavior; "it is their practice to give annual raises"; "they changed their dietary pattern"
Translations
pluralizam

pluralism

[ˈplʊərəlɪzəm] Npluralismo m

pluralism

[ˈplʊərəlɪzəm] npluralisme m

pluralism

nPluralismus m

pluralism

[ˈplʊərəˌlɪzm] npluralismo
References in classic literature ?
It is protest enough against the pluralism they want to reform if I give somebody else most of the money.
Her Majesty Queen Noor Al Hussein, who attended the closing ceremony, expressed her pride in the Arab youth for their commitment to pluralism and gender equality.
This is what makes us tout our role and message in Lebanon, the country of pluralism and the phare of freedoms in a Middle East that is torn apart by the hatred of al-Nusra Front and the criminality of Daesh," he concluded.
This article examines avenues for resolving what appears to be an inherent tension in the fallibilist argument for pluralism in economics.
Religious Pluralism and Values in the Public Sphere
Religious Pluralism and the Modern World: An Ongoing Engagement with John Hick.
A non-governmental organization called European Initiative for Media Pluralism (EIMP) is registering a Bulgarian unit.
But now that vertical control has broken down, before this pluralistic region has developed any true bottom-up pluralism -- a broad ethic of tolerance -- that might enable its people to live together as equal citizens, without an iron fist from above.
Difference unbound; the rise of pluralism in literature and criticism, 2d ed.
While the ongoing confrontation between the American state and the Catholic Church and other traditionally minded religious believers over the Obama administration's HHS mandate requiring that all employers provide insurance coverage for sterilization, abortion-inducing drugs, and contraception can be profitably analyzed through a number of lenses, I would like first to situate it in the context of America's historic engagement with the problem of religious pluralism.
1) As a prominent leader and theologian in church's mission, Newbigin's critique of pluralism in British society had resonance throughout the world.
The book is arranged in four parts: (1) Religious Pluralism and Global Perspectives, (2) Religious Pluralism and Practical Concerns, (3) Theological and Philosophical Orientations, and (4) John Hick's Writings and Their Impact.