pluralism

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plu·ral·ism

 (plo͝or′ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The condition of being multiple or plural.
2.
a. A condition in which numerous distinct ethnic, religious, or cultural groups are present and tolerated within a society.
b. The belief that such a condition is desirable or socially beneficial.
3. Ecclesiastical The holding by one person of two or more positions or offices, especially two or more ecclesiastical benefices, at the same time.
4. Philosophy
a. The doctrine that reality is composed of many ultimate substances.
b. The belief that no single explanatory system or view of reality can account for all the phenomena of life.

pluralism

(ˈplʊərəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the holding by a single person of more than one ecclesiastical benefice or office
2. (Sociology) sociol a theory of society as several autonomous but interdependent groups which either share power or continuously compete for power
3. (Sociology) the existence in a society of groups having distinctive ethnic origin, cultural forms, religions, etc
4. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) a theory that views the power of employers as being balanced by the power of trade unions in industrial relations such that the interests of both sides can be catered for
5. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. the metaphysical doctrine that reality consists of more than two basic types of substance. Compare monism2, dualism2
b. the metaphysical doctrine that reality consists of independent entities rather than one unchanging whole. Compare monism2, absolutism2b
ˈpluralist n, adj
ˌpluralˈistic adj

plu•ral•ism

(ˈplʊər əˌlɪz əm)

n.
1. (in philosophy)
a. a theory that there is more than one basic substance or principle. Compare dualism (def. 2a), monism (def. 1a).
b. a theory that reality consists of two or more independent elements.
2.
a. a condition in which minority groups participate fully in the dominant society, yet maintain their cultural differences.
b. a doctrine that society benefits from such a condition.
3. the holding by one person of two or more church offices at the same time.
4. the state or quality of being plural.
[1810–20]
plu′ral•ist, n., adj.
plu`ral•is′tic, adj.
plu`ral•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

pluralism

1. Ecclesiastic. the holding of two or more church offices by a single person.
2. the state or condition of a common civilization in which various ethnic, racial, or religious groups are free to participate in and develop their common cultures.
3. a policy or principle supporting such cultural plurality. — pluralist, n. — pluralistic, adj.
See also: Politics
1. a theory positing more than one principle or basic substance as the ground of reality. Cf. dualism, monism.
2. a theory that reality consists, not of an organic whole, but of two or more independent material or spiritual entities. — pluralist, n.pluralistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy

pluralism

1. The belief that there are more than one or two substances in the world, such as mind and matter.
2. A situation in which several different ethnic or cultural groups coexist within a society.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pluralism - a social organization in which diversity of racial or religious or ethnic or cultural groups is tolerated
social organisation, social organization, social structure, social system, structure - the people in a society considered as a system organized by a characteristic pattern of relationships; "the social organization of England and America is very different"; "sociologists have studied the changing structure of the family"
2.pluralism - the doctrine that reality consists of several basic substances or elements
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
monism - the doctrine that reality consists of a single basic substance or element
3.pluralism - the practice of one person holding more than one benefice at a time
practice, pattern - a customary way of operation or behavior; "it is their practice to give annual raises"; "they changed their dietary pattern"
Translations
pluralizam

pluralism

[ˈplʊərəlɪzəm] Npluralismo m

pluralism

[ˈplʊərəlɪzəm] npluralisme m

pluralism

nPluralismus m

pluralism

[ˈplʊərəˌlɪzm] npluralismo
References in classic literature ?
A pen-stroke might demolish his civilian epaulets, his place at court, his sinecure, his two offices and their advantages; in all, six salaries retained under fire of the law against pluralists.
That perhaps it was a little indecent that the principal registrar of all, whose duty it was to find the public, constantly resorting to this place, all needful accommodation, should be an enormous sinecurist in virtue of that post (and might be, besides, a clergyman, a pluralist, the holder of a staff in a cathedral, and what not), - while the public was put to the inconvenience of which we had a specimen every afternoon when the office was busy, and which we knew to be quite monstrous.
Adolphus Irwine, Rector of Broxton, Vicar of Hayslope, and Vicar of Blythe, a pluralist at whom the severest Church reformer would have found it difficult to look sour.
But this is a democratic stance whose basis is pretty weak because Muslims did not become democrats because they reviewed their own theological and jurisprudential sources; instead, they felt they had to be democrats and pluralists because of repression.
As an example of the ways in which each strand's "insights and blind spots" are "hard to pull apart," Levy points to some of the major policy disagreements between the rationalist Mill on the one side and the pluralists Tocqueville and Acton on the other.
However, the book's adamant defense of apophatic pluralism does not exhaust the many questions posed to pluralists.
Sometimes pluralists portray the issue as a struggle between liberals and conservatives.
For the last half-century there has been a concerted effort by religious pluralists to defend the truth of the assertion that adherents to the many and varied world religions all worship and participate in the same reality.
3) Van Inwagen's argument that ties between quantification and counting mean pluralists must believe in different kinds of numbers.
In The Christian Pluralist, Buffie and Charles present difficult questions from a layperson's perspective and invite the clergy, the laity, traditionalists and pluralists to engage in open dialogue that would create unprecedented opportunity.
He examines in particular the writing of pluralists William James, Hannah Arendt, Stuart Hampshire, and Michael Oaskeshott.
His article is helpful in that he does not believe all Christian scholarship has to be distinctly Christian and he wants Christian scholars to be principled pluralists.