poacher


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poacher1
egg poacher

poach·er 1

 (pō′chər)
n.
A vessel or dish designed for the poaching of food, such as eggs or fish.

poach·er 2

 (pō′chər)
n.
1. One who hunts or fishes illegally on the property of another.
2. Any of various elongated marine fishes of the family Agonidae, chiefly of northern waters, having an external covering of bony plates.

poacher

(ˈpəʊtʃə)
n
1. a person who illegally hunts game, fish, etc, on someone else's property
2. poacher turned gamekeeper someone whose occupation or behaviour is the opposite of what it previously was, such as a burglar who now advises on home security

poacher

(ˈpəʊtʃə)
n
(Cookery) a metal pan with individual cups for poaching eggs

poach•er1

(ˈpoʊ tʃər)

n.
a person who trespasses on private property, esp. to catch fish or game illegally.
[1660–70]

poach•er2

(ˈpoʊ tʃər)

n.
1. a covered pan in which eggs are broken into metal cups and cooked over rising steam.
2. a baking pan for simmering fish or other food.
[1860–65]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.poacher - someone who hunts or fishes illegally on the property of anotherpoacher - someone who hunts or fishes illegally on the property of another
appropriator - someone who takes for his or her own use (especially without permission)
2.poacher - a cooking vessel designed to poach food (such as fish or eggs)
cooking utensil, cookware - a kitchen utensil made of material that does not melt easily; used for cooking
vessel - an object used as a container (especially for liquids)
3.poacher - small slender fish (to 8 inches) with body covered by bony plates; chiefly of deeper northern Pacific waters
scorpaenoid, scorpaenoid fish - fishes having the head armored with bony plates
Agonus cataphractus, armed bullhead, pogge - northern Atlantic sea poacher
alligatorfish, Aspidophoroides monopterygius - small very elongate sea poachers
Translations
صَيّاد غَيْر قانوني
pytlák
krybskytte
braconnierpocheuse
orvvadász
veiîiòjófur
pytliak
divji lovec
kaçak avcı

poacher

1 [ˈpəʊtʃəʳ] N (= person) → cazador(a) m/f furtivo/a
poacher turned gamekeeper (Brit) (fig) persona que abandona una actividad para hacer todo lo contrario

poacher

2 [ˈpəʊtʃəʳ] N (for eggs) → escalfador m

poacher

[ˈpəʊtʃər] nbraconnier m

poacher

1
nWilderer m, → Wilderin f; (of game also)Wilddieb(in) m(f); it’s a case of poacher turned gamekeeper for the new Arsenal manager (Brit) → der neue Manager von Arsenal ist ein zum Paulus gewordener Saulus

poacher

2
n (for eggs) → Pochierpfanne f

poacher

[ˈpəʊtʃəʳ] n (of game) → bracconiere m

poach2

(pəutʃ) verb
to hunt (game) or catch (fish) illegally on someone else's land.
poacher noun
References in classic literature ?
Some time passed before I felt tranquil even here: I had a vague dread that wild cattle might be near, or that some sportsman or poacher might discover me.
The Heights were Heathcliff's land, and he was reproving the poacher.
Tramping, begging, thieving, working sometimes when I could - though that warn't as often as you may think, till you put the question whether you would ha' been over-ready to give me work yourselves - a bit of a poacher, a bit of a labourer, a bit of a waggoner, a bit of a haymaker, a bit of a hawker, a bit of most things that don't pay and lead to trouble, I got to be a man.
There was Jem Rodney, a known poacher, and otherwise disreputable: he had often met Marner in his journeys across the fields, and had said something jestingly about the weaver's money; nay, he had once irritated Marner, by lingering at the fire when he called to light his pipe, instead of going about his business.
I much fear that yon same fellow is a rascally poacher come after our own and the King's meat
I was brought up in the country, and my father in his leisure time was something of a poacher.
For the brickmaker had been a notorious poacher, and was suspected, though there was no good evidence against him, of being the man who had shot a neighbouring gamekeeper in the leg.
He had cheated old Wilkins out of his freehold by a trick fit for a pickpocket; he had driven old Mother Biddle to the workhouse; he had stretched the law against Long Adam, the poacher, till all the magistrates were ashamed of him.
It is Tory ground, where I and the `Pioneer' are no more welcome than a poacher and his gun.
If they did get the dog of a strange poacher, no gamekeeper or constable could identify 'm by the dog-- mum was the word.
he went on, addressing the poacher, "I fully believed you to be a man of your word; I pledged mine for you because I had your promise.
The higgler to whom the hare was sold, being unfortunately taken many months after with a quantity of game upon him, was obliged to make his peace with the squire, by becoming evidence against some poacher.