pocketbook

(redirected from pocketbooks)
Also found in: Thesaurus.
Related to pocketbooks: Scribner

pock·et·book

 (pŏk′ĭt-bo͝ok′)
n.
1. A purse; a handbag.
2. A pocket-sized folder or case used to hold money and papers; a billfold.
3. Financial resources; money supply: prices to fit your pocketbook.
4. often pocket book A pocket-sized, usually paperbound book. Also called pocket edition.

pocketbook

(ˈpɒkɪtˌbʊk)
n
1. a small bag or case for money, papers, etc, carried by a handle or in the pocket
2. (modifier) concerned with personal finance: pocketbook issues.

poc•ket•book

(ˈpɒk ɪtˌbʊk)

n.
1. a woman's purse or handbag.
2. a person's financial resources or means: out of reach of my pocketbook.
3. Also, pock′et book`. a book, usu. paperback, that is small enough to carry in a coat pocket.
[1610–20]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pocketbook - your personal financial meanspocketbook - your personal financial means; "that car is too expensive for my pocketbook"
means, substance - considerable capital (wealth or income); "he is a man of means"
2.pocketbook - a pocket-size case for holding papers and paper moneypocketbook - a pocket-size case for holding papers and paper money
case - a portable container for carrying several objects; "the musicians left their instrument cases backstage"
3.pocketbook - pocket-sized paperback bookpocketbook - pocket-sized paperback book    
4.pocketbook - a container used for carrying money and small personal items or accessories (especially by women)pocketbook - a container used for carrying money and small personal items or accessories (especially by women); "she reached into her bag and found a comb"
clasp - a fastener (as a buckle or hook) that is used to hold two things together
clutch bag, clutch - a woman's strapless purse that is carried in the hand
container - any object that can be used to hold things (especially a large metal boxlike object of standardized dimensions that can be loaded from one form of transport to another)
etui - small ornamental ladies' bag for small articles
evening bag - a handbag used with evening wear
reticule - a woman's drawstring handbag; usually made of net or beading or brocade; used in 18th and 19th centuries
shoulder bag - a large handbag that can be carried by a strap looped over the shoulder
Translations
listnica

pocketbook

[ˈpɒkɪtbʊk] N
1. (= notebook) → cuaderno m
2. (US) (= handbag) → bolso m, cartera f (LAm); (= wallet) → cartera f, billetero m; (= purse) → monedero m

pocketbook

[ˈpɒkɪtbʊk] n
(= wallet) → portefeuille m
(= notebook) → carnet m
(US) (= handbag) → sac m à mainpocket calculator ncalculatrice f de poche, calculette fpocket dictionary ndictionnaire m de pochepocket knife ncanif mpocket money nargent m de poche
£8 a week pocket money → huit livres d'argent de poche par semainepocket-sized [ˈpɒkɪtsaɪzd] pocket-size [ˈpɒkɪtsaɪz] adj [book, computer] → au format de poche

pocketbook

[ˈpɒkɪtˌbuk] n (wallet) → portafoglio; (notebook) → taccuino (Am) (handbag) → borsetta; (paperback) → tascabile m
References in classic literature ?
Joe was to become capable very soon of turning out pictures that old gentlemen with thin side-whiskers and thick pocketbooks would sandbag one another in his studio for the privilege of buying.
John had praised her, and was undoing the old pocketbook which they called the `bank', when Meg, knowing that it was quite empty, stopped his hand, saying nervously.
George glanced up and down the car to be sure no one was looking, then took out his pocketbook and counted his money.
Her three notes--unluckily they were all in my pocketbook, or I should have denied their existence, and hoarded them for ever--I was forced to put them up, and could not even kiss them.
His curling lips took a new twist upward; he tucked his umbrella briskly under his arm; and produced from the breast of his coat a large old-fashioned black pocketbook.
A leather pocketbook, a purse, in which was evidently a part of the sum which the bandit had received, with a dice box and dice, completed the possessions of the dead man.
Now, then," said Villefort, placing the letter in his pocketbook, "I must have another
The lawyer inside had generally his wits about him even when asleep; the first thing he did, after learning the cause of the excitement, was to produce a large, red pocketbook.
I have thought of that," I returned; and I drew out of my pocketbook a visiting card, neatly engraved with a name that was not my own.
I will read you their names directly; here they are, in my pocketbook.
He drew from his pocketbook a snowy little card and passed it to us with a profound bow:
and the count began bustling to get out his pocketbook.