pockets


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pock·et

 (pŏk′ĭt)
n.
1. A small baglike attachment forming part of a garment and used to carry small articles, as a flat pouch sewn inside a pair of pants or a piece of material sewn on its sides and bottom to the outside of a shirt.
2. A small sack or bag.
3. A receptacle, cavity, or opening.
4. Financial means; money supply: The cost of the trip must come out of your own pocket.
5.
a. A small cavity in the earth, especially one containing ore.
b. A small body or accumulation of ore.
6. A pouch in an animal body, such as the cheek pouch of a rodent or the abdominal pouch of a marsupial.
7. Games One of the pouchlike receptacles at the corners and sides of a billiard or pool table.
8. Sports The webbing attached to the head of a lacrosse stick, in which the ball is caught and held.
9. Baseball The deepest part of a baseball glove, just below the web, where the ball is normally caught.
10. Sports A racing position in which a contestant has no room to pass a group of contestants immediately to his or her front or side.
11.
a. A small, isolated, or protected area or group: pockets of dissatisfied voters.
b. Football The area a few yards behind the line of scrimmage that blockers attempt to keep clear so that the quarterback can pass the ball.
12. An air pocket.
13. A bin for storing ore, grain, or other materials.
adj.
1. Suitable for or capable of being carried in one's pocket: a pocket handkerchief; a pocket edition of a dictionary.
2. Small; miniature: a pocket backyard; a pocket museum.
3. Designating the two cards that are dealt to a player face down in Texas hold'em: was holding pocket eights.
tr.v. pock·et·ed, pock·et·ing, pock·ets
1. To place in a pocket: pocketed her key.
2. To take possession of for oneself, especially dishonestly: pocketed the receipts from the charity dance.
3.
a. To accept or tolerate (an insult, for example).
b. To conceal or suppress: I pocketed my pride and asked for a raise.
4. To prevent (a bill) from becoming law by failing to sign until the adjournment of the legislature.
5. Sports To hem in (a competitor) in a race.
6. Games To hit (a ball) into a pocket of a pool or billiard table.
Idioms:
in (one's) pocket
In one's power, influence, or possession: The defendant had the jury in his pocket.
in pocket
1. Having funds.
2. Having gained or retained funds of a specified amount: was a hundred dollars in pocket after a day at the races.
out of pocket
1. Out of one's own resources: fees paid out of pocket.
2. Without funds or assets: a traveler who was caught out of pocket.
3. In a state of having experienced a loss, especially a financial one.

[Middle English, pouch, small bag, from Anglo-Norman pokete, diminutive of Old North French poke, bag, of Germanic origin.]

pock′et·a·ble adj.
pock′et·less adj.

pockets

  • fishing vest - A sleeveless jacket with many pockets for carrying small objects.
  • English billiards - Played on a table with no pockets.
  • gnurr - The substance that collects over time in the bottoms of pockets or cuffs of trousers.
  • pucker - Has the underlying notion of being formed into "pockets."
References in classic literature ?
Jo immediately sat up, put her hands in her pockets, and began to whistle.
The slender expressive fingers, forever active, for- ever striving to conceal themselves in his pockets or behind his back, came forth and became the piston rods of his machinery of expression.
He was seeking through his outer coat pockets, after an ineffectual search in the inner one.
I offered my pockets, but Tony shook her head and carefully put the green insect in her hair, tying her big handkerchief down loosely over her curls.
From his trousers pockets he took a fistful of crumpled bank notes and a good deal of silver coin, which he piled on the bureau indiscriminately with keys, knife, handkerchief, and whatever else happened to be in his pockets.
Seated on the rail, with their hands in their pockets and their backs turned to Mr.
So Capital hands over the money and waltzes down to run the mine, and you original locators walks round with yer hands in yer pockets a-top of your six million profit, and you let's Capital take the work and the responsibility.
The besom of reform hath swept him out of office, and a worthier successor wears his dignity and pockets his emoluments.
Their brisk, withered little dames, in close crimped caps, long waisted short-gowns, homespun petticoats, with scissors and pin-cushions, and gay calico pockets hanging on the outside.
I can see Douglas there before the fire, to which he had got up to present his back, looking down at his interlocutor with his hands in his pockets.
Going to his heavy grego, or wrapall, or dreadnaught, which he had previously hung on a chair, he fumbled in the pockets, and produced at length a curious little deformed image with a hunch on its back, and exactly the color of a three days' old Congo baby.
In the forecastle, the sailors had actually caulked and pitched their chests, and filled them; it was humorously added, that the cook had clapped a head on his largest boiler, and filled it; that the steward had plugged his spare coffee-pot and filled it; that the harpooneers had headed the sockets of their irons and filled them; that indeed everything was filled with sperm, except the captain's pantaloons pockets, and those he reserved to thrust his hands into, in self-complacent testimony of his entire satisfaction.